How to Clean a Bass

How to Clean a Bass
A fresh bass is a mouth-watering dish best prepared after a recent catch. But cooking skills aren't the only thing you need to show off your catch. You need to thoroughly clean the bass with care before reaping the rewards. Take as much care and attention with the preparation as you do with your catch and enjoy a sizzling bass dinner tonight.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Dull knife Sharp knife Cold water Container with holes
  • Dull knife
  • Sharp knife
  • Cold water
  • Container with holes
Step 1
Place your bass under the faucet and rinse the fish for about five minutes with cold water.
Step 2
Turn off the water and, using a dull knife, scrape the scales towards the fish's head with short strokes. The tail should be facing you while you work. When you've finished one side, work on the other. This may take some time to complete, depending on the amount of scales and how easily they come loose.
Step 3
Rinse the fish occasionally with more cold water to remove excess scales.
Step 4
Turn the bass over and insert a sharp knife in the hole of the fish's underbelly. You should find it near the tail. A boning knife from a fishing retailer will be easy to manage. Try to avoid using a knife with a serrated edge like a steak knife.
Step 5
Slice the bass open from the hole you're working from to a set of fins on the belly. Rinse the fish again in cold water.
Step 6
Pull out any guts from the fish and put them aside.
Step 7
Slice off the head at an angle. Work from the bottom of the jaw upward and cut through the tissue.
Step 8
Rinse out the open fish under cold water and check for any extra scales, guts, or miscellaneous tissue.
Step 9
Cover the bass with the cavity facing down and place it in a container with holes to drain excess water. Store the container and fish on ice until it's ready to be cooked.

Tips & Warnings

 
Clean the fish as quickly as possible after a fresh catch.
 
Fish scales can puncture your skin. Make sure your hands are free from any scales or wounds when you're finished.

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