How to Make PVC Pipe Snowshoes

How to Make PVC Pipe Snowshoes
Winter camping provides the opportunity for a variety of activities that summer camping doesn't. One of these activities is snowshoeing. Cost is the most common excuse people have for not trying this winter sport. Store-made snowshoes can get pricey--some run upwards of $150. But with a little bit of work, you can make your own pair of snowshoes for under $30.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • 2 pieces of 10-foot PVC pipe (the stronger the better) 6 metal rods with lacing on ends 12 wingnut bolts Two PVC end caps Stove 3 to 4 quarts of sand Metal funnel Hand drill 2 - 2 1/4-inch machine screws and nuts 50 feet nylon rope 2 7-foot lengths of lampwick
  • 2 pieces of 10-foot PVC pipe (the stronger the better)
  • 6 metal rods with lacing on ends
  • 12 wingnut bolts
  • Two PVC end caps
  • Stove
  • 3 to 4 quarts of sand
  • Metal funnel
  • Hand drill
  • 2 - 2 1/4-inch machine screws and nuts
  • 50 feet nylon rope
  • 2 7-foot lengths of lampwick
 
Step 1
Heat the sand on the stove. Cap one end of the PVC and fill with sand. The PVC will become soft and pliable.
Step 2
Wearing gloves, shape the PVC into a feather shape making sure both ends meet evenly. Allow to cool, remove cap and empty out sand. Repeat for other pipe. These will be the frames for the shoes.
Step 3
Drill a hole at the base and tighten the ends together with a screw.
Step 4
Drill holes where the ball of your foot will go, above your foot and where your heel will go. Insert metal rods. Use nuts to tighten each end.
Step 5
Use rope to weave the areas above and below the hole for the toe of your shoe (the area between the rods for the ball of your foot and the one above your toe). Use an over-under weave and work down the frame and back. Keep rope tight.
Step 6
Attach the lampwick or straps using the "lampwick binding" technique for bindings. Lampwick is available at some hardware stores and online.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Always use adult supervision when dealing with stove, hot sand and drill. These snowshoes are intended for recreational purposes only. The writer and publishing site are not responsible for any injuries that occur during use.

Article Written By Casey Knopik

Casey Knopik grew up in the foothills of Mount Rainier and currently resides in the Seattle, Wash. area. He graduated from Eastern Washington University with a degree in journalism. Knopik has written for "The Easterner," "Sports Northwest Magazine" and many local newspapers. His articles appear on Trails.com.

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