How to Repair RV Window Seals

How to Repair RV Window Seals
RVs are like houses, in that they require regular basic maintenance in ways a car or truck never does. Such is the case with the windows on an RV body, which are more like the windows of your house than the windows of your car. They are usually sealed with caulk, and caulk eventually wears down with exposure to the elements. Fixing them is easy, especially if you are already good with a caulking gun.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Razor blade Bucket Sponge Plastic scrub brush Car wash detergent, ammonia or rubbing alcohol Masking tape (optional) Caulking gun Tube or clear silicon caulk
  • Razor blade
  • Bucket
  • Sponge
  • Plastic scrub brush
  • Car wash detergent, ammonia or rubbing alcohol
  • Masking tape (optional)
  • Caulking gun
  • Tube or clear silicon caulk
Step 1
Take a razor blade and remove as much of the old caulking from the window frame as you can. Take care not to cut or scratch the outside wall of the RV. Be thorough. All the old caulk must be removed before you can form a new, tight seal.
Step 2
Clean the area around the window. Use car washing detergent and a sponge, or an ammonia or rubbing alcohol-based solution and a scrub brush for tougher jobs. Just remember to rinse the window area with a sponge and not a hose, since you have just removed the window caulking and any backwash will get inside the RV.
Step 3
Apply masking tape to a circular area, roughly 1/8 inch from the window frame, just as you would if you were painting near molding.
Step 4
Cut the tip off a tube of clear silicon caulk, put the tube in a caulking gun and apply caulk to the perimeter of the window frame, using low, steady pressure on the gun trigger.
Step 5
Using rubber gloves, push the line of caulking into the underside of the window frame. If you are handy with a caulking gun, skip this step.
Step 6
Wait 24 hours. Remove the masking tape (if any) and trim any excess caulk away with the razor blade. If the caulk and masking tape overlap, use the razor blade to cut around the perimeter of the caulking so that pulling the tape off doesn't take the caulk with it.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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