How to Make a Fishing Net

How to Make a Fishing Net
Nets are real assets in survival situations. Survivalists know that gill nets, in particular, are so effective at catching fish that they are illegal in many places. That's why they're included in high-end survival kits. When you fish with a line, you can only catch one fish at a time, and you have to be there to reel it in. A net can be stretched across a stream and left unattended. You'll catch dozens of fish and have food for weeks. It's a great way to maximize your efforts.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Tying a Gill Net

Things You’ll Need:
  • Tape measure Hammer Two poles Two 16 foot suspension lines (size 48) Large roll of cord (size 18) Knife 1 1/4-inch spacer
  • Tape measure
  • Hammer
  • Two poles
  • Two 16 foot suspension lines (size 48)
  • Large roll of cord (size 18)
  • Knife
  • 1 1/4-inch spacer
Step 1
Set up the top suspension line and gauge line. Lay out 12 feet with your tape measure, and hammer in the poles. Stretch a size 48 line between the poles and attach it to them at about chest height. Use your knife and tape measure to cut a cord 16 feet long, then tie it loosely between the poles, just below the top suspension line.
Step 2
Attach vertical drop lines to the top suspension line. Cut 10-foot lengths of cord and fold them in half. Starting at one pole, dangle the fold of each cord over the top suspension line and bring the doubled cord around the top suspension line and through the loop, created by the fold, to form a girth hitch. Using your spacer to maintain a 1 1/4-inch separation between each vertical drop line, continue tying the doubled cords to the top suspension line until you reach the other pole.
Step 3
Tie the vertical drop lines together in rows. Use your spacer to move the gauge line 1 1/4 inches below the top suspension line on both poles. Starting at one pole, tie the second line of the first doubled vertical drop line to the first line of the second doubled vertical drop line. Line yourself up with the gauge line and tie an overhand knot by pinching the lines together and wrapping them around the dangling lines and through the loop you just created.

Tie the free line of the second doubled vertical drop line to the first line of the third doubled vertical drop line, in the same way. Continue this process until you've tied to the inside line of the last double vertical drop line, making sure each knot is lined up with the gauge line.

Use the spacer to move the gauge line another 1 1/4 inches down and start the process again. This time start with the first line of the first doubled vertical drop line and end with the last line of the last doubled vertical drop line.

When you tie the third row of knots, you will once again start with the second line of the first doubled vertical drop line. Continue to alternate your starting and ending points, as you move down the rows, until you are 3 feet below the top suspension line.
Step 4
Set up the bottom suspension line and attach the vertical drop lines to it. Stretch the second size 48 line between the poles where you stopped tying the doubled vertical drop lines together. Wrap the doubled vertical drop lines around the bottom suspension line twice, then separate the lines in each pair and tie them in a knot around the bottom suspension line. Cut off any excess with your knife.
Step 5
Attach the top and bottom suspension lines to the net corners. To keep the net from slipping off the ends of the top and bottom suspension lines, untie these lines from the poles and tie them to the outer vertical drop lines at each corner.

Article Written By Dan Eash

Dan Eash began writing professionally in 1989, with articles in LaHabra's "Daily Star Progress" and the "Fullerton College Magazine." Since then, he's created scripts for doctor and dentist offices and published manuals, help files and a training video. His freelance efforts also include a book. Eash has a Fullerton College Associate of Arts in music/recording production and a Nova Institute multimedia production certificate.

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