How to Make Pinecone Bird Feeders

How to Make Pinecone Bird Feeders
Pinecone bird feeders are a simple craft that can aid both migratory and resident birds, especially in colder months when food is less available. In warmer months, pinecone bird feeders can subsidize parents and young birds but should be monitored and replaced regularly to prevent the peanut butter from spoiling. Attracting the birds to an easily viewable spot can aid young bird watchers hoping to learn about their avian neighbors.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Pinecone Peanut butter Wax paper Birdseed 3 feet of string or yarn
  • Pinecone
  • Peanut butter
  • Wax paper
  • Birdseed
  • 3 feet of string or yarn
Step 1
Tie the string or yarn to the top of the pinecone so you'll be able to hang the pinecone to a tree limb or other structure.
Step 2
Coat the pinecone with peanut butter, getting peanut butter inside the open spaces between the seed scales.
Step 3
Spread birdseed on a sheet of wax paper. Choose birdseed that is specific for the birds you want to feed.
Step 4
Roll the pinecone in the birdseed until it is covered.
Step 5
Hang the bird feeder on a branch. It should hang a few feet down to prevent other animals from stealing the food.

Tips & Warnings

 
In warm weather, peanut butter spoils quickly and can separate into its constituent parts. Do not use excessive amounts of peanut butter when feeding nesting birds. The peanut butter could be transferred to the bird's feathers, then to the eggs, causing harm.
 
In warm weather, peanut butter spoils quickly and can separate into its constituent parts.
 
Do not use excessive amounts of peanut butter when feeding nesting birds. The peanut butter could be transferred to the bird's feathers, then to the eggs, causing harm.

Article Written By David Chandler

David Chandler has been a freelance writer since 2006 whose work has appeared in various print and online publications. A former reconnaissance Marine, he is an active hiker, diver, kayaker, sailor and angler. He has traveled extensively and holds a bachelor's degree from the University of South Florida where he was educated in international studies and microbiology.

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