How to Build Fishing Lures

How to Build Fishing Lures
Building hard plastic fishing lures, like crankbaits, allow crafty anglers to produce a lure that is uniquely theirs. There are many styles of crankbait bodies available from tackle retailers that just need a paint job and hooks in order to get them fishing. Shallow running minnow baits are a popular crankbait for walleyes and bass, and with a few simple steps you can construct one of these efficient lures.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Unpainted crankbait body Various lure paints Clear-coat sealer Small paint brush Split rings Split ring pliers Treble hooks
  • Unpainted crankbait body
  • Various lure paints
  • Clear-coat sealer
  • Small paint brush
  • Split rings
  • Split ring pliers
  • Treble hooks
 
Step 1
Choose a desired base color for your lure and paint the entire lure that color. Make sure to use paint that is especially designed for lures; it is usually a chip-resistant lacquer paint that dries quickly and results in a high-gloss finish.
Step 2
After the base layer has dried, paint a contrasting color on the belly. Usually a bright color is preferred on the belly and a dark color on the back.
Step 3
Add dots or stripes on the side of the lure and a pair of eyes on the front. Use a color that contrasts with the base color so these smaller details will stand out on the lure.
Step 4
After the paint is dry, add a clear coat layer to the lure. This will protect the paint and keep it intact through many hours of fishing. You might also want to add a UV-protection overcoat, which helps to reflect sunlight under the water, making the lure appear brighter to fish.
Step 5
Add a split ring to the eyelets found at the nose, bottom and back of the lure. Use the split ring pliers to open the split ring and slide the opening of the ring into the eyelet. Rotate the split ring until it is inside the eyelet.
Step 6
Add the treble hooks to the bottom and rear split rings, using the same technique as you used to put the split rings on the eyelets. At this point, your homemade crankbait is ready to hit the water.
 

Article Written By Brian M. Kelly

Brian M. Kelly has been freelance writing since 2003. His work has been published in respected outdoor magazines such as Outdoor Life, Great Lakes Angler and Salmon Trout Steelheader. He holds an associate's degree in automated machine design from Macomb College.

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