Snowboard Carving

Snowboard Carving
While many skiers use the the derogatory terms "shredders" and "knuckle draggers" to describe snowboarders, most do not realize that advanced riders are quite skilled in the art of carving. A snowboard carved turn involves linking a toe-side turn with a heel-side turn.

Learning this type of turn is the next step after learning the basics of snowboarding. It requires you to maintain a high edge angle and travel faster than you would for most skidded turns. The snowboard carved turn has some distinct advantages over the skidded turn. For example, on uneven terrain such as crud, a board that is on edge will provide for a smoother ride. Additionally, a carved turn is a quieter turn, so you will not be getting as many dirty looks from skiers!
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Snowboard
  • Snowboard boots
  • Snowboard clothing
  • Snowboard helmet
  • Snowboard goggles
  • Snowboard gloves
 
Step 1
Choose a wide and relatively uncrowded slope. At first, you will be traversing across the trail. Choosing a wide and uncrowded slope will prevent you from becoming a duck in a shooting gallery.
Step 2
Lift the toes of your downhill foot, bend your knees and rock your shoulder toward the heel edge of your snowboard to initiate a heel-side carved turn.
Step 3
Maintain your heel-side edge as you traverse across the slope.
Step 4
Flatten your snowboard by relaxing your front foot when you are near the end of the line. This will cause the board to turn toward the fall line. To traverse in the opposite direction, shift your weight to the toe-side edge of your opposite foot and press the toes of your downhill foot into the snow.
Step 5
Perform the same traverse on your toe-side edge.
Step 6
Look at your tracks. If you see a thin, clean line across the snow, you have mastered the art of staying on edge, and you are ready to link your turns. However, if your tracks are messy, or if the line zigzags, you are still falling back into skid mode and need more practice.
Step 7
Increase your edge angle and point your board down the fall line. If you maintain the edge, your board will carve back up the hill. Once this happens, the uphill leg will become the new downhill leg. Link your turns together.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
A lesson with a certified snowboard instructor will help you improve your technique.
 
Tackling terrain that's too advanced will lead to serious injury. Always wear a helmet on the slopes. You're ready to attempt this move when you can ride on blue or intermediate terrain at a comfortable speed.
 
Tackling terrain that's too advanced will lead to serious injury.
 
Always wear a helmet on the slopes.
 
You're ready to attempt this move when you can ride on blue or intermediate terrain at a comfortable speed.

Article Written By Lisa Mercer

In 1999, Lisa Mercer’s fitness, travel and skiing expertise inspired a writing career. Her books include "Open Your Heart with Winter Fitness" and "101 Women's Fitness Tips." Her articles have appeared in "Aspen Magazine," "HerSports," "32 Degrees," "Pregnancy Magazine" and "Wired." Mercer has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the City College of New York.

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