Homemade Fishing Rod Holders

Homemade Fishing Rod Holders
Many fishermen opt to not hold their fishing rods all day long as they are striving to bring in a fish. Instead, they position their poles into fishing rod holders. A fishing rod holder must be able to not only hold up the pole, but also support the hoped-for weight of a big bite at which point the fisherman will typically dive to the pole and resume control. Fishing rod holders can be made quickly right at home.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Homemade Fishing Rod Holders

Things You’ll Need:
  • 1 1/2 foot PVC pipe Cutter's drill 2 machine screws Screwdriver Sturdy wood board
  • 1 1/2 foot PVC pipe
  • Cutter's drill
  • 2 machine screws
  • Screwdriver
  • Sturdy wood board
Step 1
Obtain a 1 1/2-foot length of PVC pipe. If you need to cut a longer length of pipe, use a pipe cutter.
Step 2
Drill through the PVC pipe. Exactly 1 inch from the bottom of the pipe, drill a 1/8-inch wide hole through one side of the pipe. Do not let it pierce the other side.
Step 3
Repeat Step 2. Drill another hole exactly 1 inch above the previous hole (2 inches from the bottom of the pipe). Make sure the two holes line up with each other. You should now have a PVC pipe with two holes on one side. They should be lined up with each other.
Step 4
Align the pipe with the board. Lay a sturdy, heavy board on the ground. The board should be between 3/4- to 1-foot wide and at least 3 feet long. Lay the PVC pipe perpendicular to the board, so that both holes are against the board (in preparation for screws).
Step 5
Attach pipe to the board. Use machine screws to screw the PVC pipe to the board. You should now be able to stand the board up on its edge with the pipe rising between 3/4- to 1/2-foot above it.

Tips & Warnings

 
On a boat, lean the board against the side of the boat. It should also be parallel to the side of the boat, board-side inward. On the beach, dig a 1-foot-deep hole in which to bury the board, thereby securing it in the sand.
 
On a boat, lean the board against the side of the boat. It should also be parallel to the side of the boat, board-side inward.
 
On the beach, dig a 1-foot-deep hole in which to bury the board, thereby securing it in the sand.

Article Written By William Jackson

William Jackson has written, reported and edited professionally for more than 10 years. His work has been published in newspapers, magazines, scholarly journals, high-level government reports, books and online. He holds a master's degree in humanities from Pennsylvania State University.

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