How to Carry Eggs on a Camping Trip

How to Carry Eggs on a Camping Trip
Planning the transport of the fragile fresh egg is a challenge to backpackers and campers, many of whom believe that the powdered variety belongs in a fowl and distant food group. The quest for fresh product carried without leakage can follow either of two basic strategies, depending on whether the goal is discreet individuals for frying or boiling, or a scrambled fusion, suitable for omelets, wraps or breakfast burritos.
Many freeze-dried egg mixes (usually in tough 4 to 8 oz. packets) are tasty, but lack "real-egg" consistency. For car-campers, the issues of weight and refrigeration are trivial. Backpacking egg-lovers must balance these concerns with their tolerance for processed eggs.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Carrying Individual Eggs

Things You’ll Need:
  • Eggs, fresh, powdered or freeze-dried Plastic egg container Duct tape Air-tight container, plastic or stainless steel Seasonings Fork Salt Tortillas
  • Eggs, fresh, powdered or freeze-dried
  • Plastic egg container
  • Duct tape
  • Air-tight container, plastic or stainless steel
  • Seasonings
  • Fork
  • Salt
  • Tortillas
 
Step 1
Tuck the eggs into the niches of a plastic egg container, available at
discount or hiking supply stores. Secure the top of the container with duct tape, even though it clicks shut independent of tape. Secured this way, the delicate gems will remain fresh the length of any camping trip if kept out of direct sunlight.
Step 2
Encase the container with a large Ziplock bag in case your pack suffers an unexpected blow.
Step 3
Place the package in protected part of your pack, surrounded by soft objects.

Pre-mixed Eggs

Step 1
Break eggs into a bowl or camping container and add appropriate spices, cooked meat or cheese. Break the yolks. Mix things up and add a teaspoon of salt to maintain the integrity of the texture during freezing.
Step 2
Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and freeze it. Although it is not strictly necessary, freezing extends the fresh-life of the eggs.
Step 3
After freezing, enclose your package in a Ziplock bag before placing it in your pack.
 

Article Written By Barry Truman

Barry Truman has published many outdoor activity articles in the past five years with International Real Travel Adventures, the Everett Herald and Seattle Post Intelligencer newspapers, Backpacking Light Magazine and Trails.com. He has a forestry degree from the University of Washington.

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