How to Make Your Own Fishing Net

How to Make Your Own Fishing Net
Fishing equipment can be as complicated or as simple as you want it to be. At its most basic, it consists of a pole, line, a hook and bait. But even at its simplest, a good net can minimize awkward plunges and fights to get that fish the last few feet. Nets are available commercially, but you can also make your own with some simple materials. The advantage of making your own net is that you get the size and depth that you need for a fraction of the cost of buying one.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Making a Fishing Net

Things You’ll Need:
  • Discarded tennis racket, snowshoe or butterfly net depending on size and strength that you will need One or two yards of netting Newsprint Scissors Nylon thread Pins Sewing needle Binding Optional: Sewing machine
  • Discarded tennis racket, snowshoe or butterfly net depending on size and strength that you will need
  • One or two yards of netting
  • Newsprint
  • Scissors
  • Nylon thread
  • Pins
  • Sewing needle
  • Binding
  • Optional: Sewing machine
Step 1
Measure the diameter of your net form (the racket or snowshoe). Determine the depth of the net. You'll want it to be a minimum of twice the diameter. Add three inches to this measurement, and draw a pattern on newsprint and cut it out.
Step 2
Fold the netting in half so that you have a double layer. Place the pattern on top of the netting and pin the pieces together. Cut the netting by following the pattern.
Step 3
Sew the binding to the top portion of the netting. It should fold over the netting to form a solid edge.
Step 4
Sew the two halves of the netting together so that you have a bag shape.
Step 5
Place the net bag so that it is on the inside of the form. Pull the edge with the binding over the form so that it meets the netting from the other side. Hand sew the pieces together.

Tips & Warnings

 
If you can't find a racket or snowshoe for a form, you can build your own out of a flexible material and a broom handle.
 
Test your net for strength before using it for fishing. It pays to sew the seams and edges twice for extra strength.

Article Written By Catherine Rayburn-Trobaug

Catherine Rayburn-Trobaugh has been a writer and college writing professor since 1992. She has written for international companies, published numerous feature articles in the "Wilmington News-Journal," and won writing contests for her poetry and fiction. Rayburn-Trobaugh earned a Master of Arts in English from Wright State University.

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