How to Make Fishing Weights

How to Make Fishing Weights
Making your own fishing gear offers you an opportunity to have a custom setup. This is especially appealing to those who take the sport seriously. The weights used to sink baits and lures are something that can be made in whatever size, shape or weight that you prefer, and you will save some money in the process.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Welding gloves
  • Safety goggles
  • Protective clothing
  • Lead (available at most scrap metal dealers)
  • Small cast iron pot with pouring spout on side
  • Vise grips
  • Metal bucket
  • Sinker molds, numerous varieties are available at tackle shops and fishing supply stores
  • Propane camp stove or barbecue grill with a side burner
  • Large metal spoon
  • Edge trimming tool
Step 1
Put on heavy duty clothing and all other safety gear. Take care when dealing with the molten lead.
Step 2
Put the lead into the pot, filling it only partially. A full pot of molten lead is dangerous. Securely clamp the vise grips onto the pot opposite the handle. Test to ensure that the stove can support the weight of the pot and lead prior to heating. It may be necessary to put an additional sturdy grate over the stove's grate so that it can safely support the pot.
Step 3
Light the burner on the stove and place the pot on it, heating it until the lead is melted. The impurities in the lead will float to the surface during this process. Scoop these impurities off the top and dispose of them by placing them in a metal bucket or a similar container.
Step 4
Grab hold of both the pot handle and the vise grips at the same time, and take the pot from the stove. Carefully pour the lead from the spout on the side of the pot and into the molds.
Step 5
Allow the lead in the molds to cool completely. Turn the molds over and tap them lightly to remove the sinkers. Use the edge trimming tool to trim the rough edges of the sinkers.

Tips & Warnings

 
Be very careful not to allow water to drip into the molten lead. This can cause very dangerous popping of hot lead.

Article Written By Anthony Smith

Anthony Smith began writing for Demand Studios in May of 2009 and has since written over 1400 articles for them. He also writes for "The College Baseball Newsletter." He attended the University of New Mexico, and has more than 25 years of experience in the business world.

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