How to Remove Hummingbird Feeders

How to Remove Hummingbird Feeders
Hummingbird feeders are an excellent way to invite beautiful and fascinating hummingbirds into your backyard. Because hummingbirds have excellent memories, they will return to your reliable food source each year after returning from their southward journey for the winter. Deciding when to remove your hummingbird feeders and replace them depends on the migration patterns of hummingbirds.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Step 1
Keep fresh nectar in your feeder. Throughout the year, clean your hummingbird feeder and replace it with fresh nectar once a week. Also, if you notice debris in the nectar or ants, replace the nectar. Replenishing the nectar regularly prevents it from spoiling or becoming contaminated.
Step 2
Remove your hummingbird feeder for the winter after no birds have appeared for approximately two weeks. A common misconception is that hummingbirds will not migrate unless you remove your feeders. Hummingbirds will naturally vacate the region regardless of food availability. Depending on where you live, you might keep your feeder up until mid-October.
Step 3
Hang your hummingbird feeder again in the spring. Hummingbirds begin returning as early as March. If you live in a more northern region, you might need to wait until May before seeing hummingbirds. Be sure your feeder is out in time for the birds to find it.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Hummingbirds often eat in excess just prior to migrating. Be sure to keep your hummingbird feeder out until they get their fill and begin their journey.
 
In temperate climates, hummingbird feeders can be left out year round, as long as they are well maintained.
 
Hummingbird feeders will freeze and can crack in very cold weather. Consider bringing yours in or wrapping it in Christmas lights.

Article Written By Anton Busch

Anton Busch earned a B.A. in English with honors from University of Iowa in 2007 and has been publishing content on the Web ever since. His creative and nonfiction works have appeared in print in "Hotel Amerika," "Earthwords," "Lux Magazine," "Quad City View" and "Verdure Magazine." He also writes for various websites.

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