How to Add Line to a Telescoping Fishing Rod

How to Add Line to a Telescoping Fishing Rod
Telescoping fishing rods make a great addition to any daypack. With a flick of your wrist, an ultralight rod snaps out, ready for use. Make sure you're ready to catch that monster in the trout stream by respooling your telescoping rod with fresh line before the season starts.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Telescoping rod and reel
  • New spool of fishing line
  • Pocketknife
  • Snap swivels
  • Pencil
Step 1
Strip off the old line on your telescoping rod and reel combo down to the bare spool, then clip the line with your pocketknife.
Step 2
Check the line capacity of the reel on your telescoping rod. The maximum line rating can be found on the outside barrel of the spool. Most telescoping rods use ultralight reels for a compact size to fit easily in a backpack. While convenient, it also means you will get less line on the reel. Use line with the lowest pound test rating you are comfortable with. Ultralight combos work well with 4- to 6-pound test.
Step 3
Extend the telescoping rod to full length.
Step 4
Thread the end of the new line through the rod tip and down through the guides to the reel.
Step 5
Lift the bail on the spincasting reel.
Step 6
Wrap the new line four to five times around the spool, loop the line under the wrappings and tie it off, clipping the excess line close to the knot with your pocketknife.
Step 7
Insert a pencil through the spool of new line and have a friend hold both sides of the pencil like an axle.
Step 8
Turn the spool of new line so it comes off the spool in the same direction that it goes on the reel. You want to add new line in the same twist as it was spooled at the factory, so you can eliminate tangles and line twisting on the water.
Step 9
Add fresh line by cranking the retrieval handle on your reel, filling the spool only to the recommended capacity.
Step 10
Tie a snap swivel to the end of the line and clip the snap to the reel bail so the line will not slip off.

Article Written By James Clark

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.

Keep Me Informed

Weekly newsletters, announcements and offers from Trails.com to your inbox.

Sign me up!

We HATE spam and promise to keep your email addresses safe and secure.