How to Make a Canoe Carrier

How to Make a Canoe Carrier
Canoeing in your favorite waterway is a great way to spend the day outdoors. While you can lose yourself in the peacefulness of the fresh air and beautiful views, the reality of getting there can be a headache. You can strap the canoe to the top of your vehicle if you have a roof rack or you can buy a commercially made pull-behind unit, but on-roof carrying is awkward and buying a pre-made carrier is expensive. You can build a road-worthy pull-behind canoe carrier with simple tools and a free afternoon.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • 2 low-speed tires on rims with bolts 2"x4"x8' length of wood 2 3 1/2" lag bolts 2 eye bolts Tie-downs Tape measure Drill Saw (Skill Saw is preferred but handsaw will work)
  • 2 low-speed tires on rims with bolts
  • 2"x4"x8' length of wood
  • 2 3 1/2" lag bolts
  • 2 eye bolts
  • Tie-downs
  • Tape measure
  • Drill
  • Saw (Skill Saw is preferred but handsaw will work)
Step 1
Measure your canoe at the widest part and add several inches to get the measurement for the axle. Cut the 2x4 for the axle with the saw.
Step 2
Drill holes for the bolts in the ends of the cut piece of 2x4. Attach wheels to the axle with the lag bolts. Don't tighten completely; the wheels should move freely.
Step 3
Cut the remaining piece of 2x4 about two inches shorter than the axle for the cross piece. This will hold the canoe steady.
Step 4
Cut a groove in the cross piece of 2x4 that is the width of the canoe's keel strip so that the canoe can rest in it.
Step 5
Attach the cross piece to the axle with the lag bolts.
Step 6
Screw the eye bolts into the ends of the cross piece to tie down the canoe and secure it to your vehicle. Make sure the canoe is secured firmly before transporting.

Tips & Warnings

 
By modifying the size, these plans can be made to haul a kayak.
 
This cart isn't for highway use. Check your state's regulations on usage.

Article Written By Catherine Rayburn-Trobaug

Catherine Rayburn-Trobaugh has been a writer and college writing professor since 1992. She has written for international companies, published numerous feature articles in the "Wilmington News-Journal," and won writing contests for her poetry and fiction. Rayburn-Trobaugh earned a Master of Arts in English from Wright State University.

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