How to Make Floating Worms for Fishing

How to Make Floating Worms for FishingSince 1949, both advanced and novice fishermen have employed plastic worms--or floating worm lures--to get the fish to bite. Floating worms have gone in and out of style through the years, but never disappeared. Pros often use them in fishing tournaments and competitions. Can you make your own floating worm? Yes, and here's how.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

How to Make Floating Worms for Fishing

Things You’ll Need:
  • 1/8-inch rubber tubing
  • Rubber tube cutter
  • Metal wire
  • Superglue
  • Paint
 
Step 1
Obtain thin rubber tubing. Ideally the tubing will be around 1/8 inch thick. Avoid purchasing tubing that is more than 1/4 inch thick--or your worm is liable to turn into a snake. The tubing is usually available at hardware stores.
Step 2
Cut 4-3/4 inches of rubber tubing off of the roll.
Step 3
Insert a 4-inch-long metal wire into the inside of the rubber tubing. Bend the wire slightly so that the rubber tubing is forced to bend, too. Most floating worms aren't perfectly straight, but they aren't overly curved or twisty, either. You'll want a little curve to your worm, though, to fool the fish.
Step 4
Use a dollop of superglue to seal the both ends of the rubber tubing. Allow the "worm" to sit for at least two hours as the superglue dries, and some glue brands take longer; check the glue's label.
Step 5
Paint the worm. The color is entirely up to you. Some fishermen swear that the more outrageous the color, the better--and they thus employ hot pink, bright yellow, or blue-and-green striped floating worms. Others prefer drab brown colors to more genuinely match the actual earthworm.
 

Article Written By William Jackson

William Jackson has written, reported and edited professionally for more than 10 years. His work has been published in newspapers, magazines, scholarly journals, high-level government reports, books and online. He holds a master's degree in humanities from Pennsylvania State University.

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