How to Tie Knots for Tree Climbing

How to Tie Knots for Tree Climbing
When climbing trees, knots are depended upon for safety and for convenience. Two useful knots are the bowline and the marline spike knots. Properly tied, the bowline will not slip under pressure. It is easily untied and by using a bowline on each end, two ropes can be securely joined. Once up in a tree, the marline spike knot is handy for pulling up objects or tools. Attach a carabiner clip to the loop and objects can be easily and securely hoisted.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

How to a Bowline Knot

Things You’ll Need:
  • Climbing rope
  • Climbing rope
Step 1
Grasp the standing line and make an overhand loop. Run the tag end through the small loop. Add more or less rope to make the bowline loop the desired size. Refer to the Step 1 illustration.
Step 2
Ensure the tag end is 8 to 10 inches long after it passes through the small loop. Run the tag end under the standing line and up through the small loop one more time. Refer to the Step 2 illustration.
Step 3
Slowly tighten the knot by pulling on the tag end and standing line. Ensure the knot is snug and check for slipping by tugging on each leg of the loop. Refer to the Step 3 illustration.

How to Tie a Marline Spike Knot

Step 1
Pick a spot along the length of the rope where you want to tie the marline spike. Hold the tag end and standing line in each hand. Form a simple overhand loop. Refer to the Step 1 illustration.
Step 2
Pass a section of the standing line under and through the loop. It's important to use the section of rope that was on top of the loop. Refer to the Step 2 illustration.
Step 3
Pull the line all the way through the loop. Adjust the length of the rope to get the desired finished loop size. Refer to the Step 3 illustration.
Step 4
Pull on both the standing line and the tag end. Adjust the line until the loop is the desired size. Tighten the knot until it is snug. Refer to the Step 4 illustration.

Article Written By Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray has been writing for over 15 years. He has been published in "Florida Sportsman" magazine. He holds an FAA airframe and powerplant license and FCC radiotelephone license, and is also a licensed private pilot. He attended the University of South Florida.

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