How to Grow Fishing Worms

How to Grow Fishing Worms
Worms feed on leaves, twigs and other simple organic matter. As long as they have a cool, damp place with plenty to eat, worms will pretty much take care of themselves. A single bucket can easily grow 3,000 worms or more in a year, providing plenty of bait for fishing, selling and sharing with friends.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Watertight container Soil Decaying plant matter Shortening Cornmeal Worms Burlap Wood Water Extra bucket
  • Watertight container
  • Soil
  • Decaying plant matter
  • Shortening
  • Cornmeal
  • Worms
  • Burlap
  • Wood
  • Water
  • Extra bucket
Step 1
Get a watertight container such as a food bucket or old washtub. If your container is made out of tin, galvanized iron or another material that can rust, paint the inside with a layer of house paint or some other coating to prevent the water from coming in contact with the sides of the bucket.
Step 2
Mix three parts rich, soil with one part plant matter. You can use decaying leaves and grasses, moss and small twigs. Fill your container up about 8 inches deep.
Step 3
Mix half a pound of shortening and a pound of cornmeal in with the top 2 to 3 inches of the soil.
Step 4
Add 100 fishing worms into the soil, and cover up the container with strips of wood or a wet piece of burlap. Red wigglers grow quickly and are great fishing worms.
Step 5
Feed the worms in one month by mixing in the same proportion of cornmeal and shortening. Add one quart water to moisten the soil. In another two weeks, feed and water the worms again.
Step 6
Harvest the worms by pulling the top several inches of soil out of the container and spreading it loosely in a 10-quart bucket. Leave it there for about half an hour, then put the dirt back in the original container. Most of the worms will be left behind in the new bucket.

Tips & Warnings

 
Don't use sandy soil. Your worms will do better if they start in rich, fertile soil. Keep the worms in a cool, moist place.
 
Don't use sandy soil. Your worms will do better if they start in rich, fertile soil.
 
Keep the worms in a cool, moist place.

Article Written By Isaiah David

Isaiah David is a freelance writer and musician living in Portland, Ore. He has over five years experience as a professional writer and has been published on various online outlets. He holds a degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.

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