How To Cast a Baitcaster

How To Cast a Baitcaster
Baitcasting reels are a popular choice among many fishermen. From freshwater species, such as large-mouth bass, to saltwater fish, including king mackerel, many fishermen simply prefer to use a baitcasting reel instead of spinning reels. Operating a baitcaster can be a little intimidating at first; however, once the basics are understood and with a little practice it is something that can be accomplished by most people.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Baitcaster rod and matching reel Monofilament fishing line Practice plug or lure with hooks removed
  • Baitcaster rod and matching reel
  • Monofilament fishing line
  • Practice plug or lure with hooks removed
Step 1
Hold the handle of the rod so that the hand securely holds the rod and the thumb can comfortably access the release button located on the back of the reel.
Step 2
Point the rod toward the target, and depress the button with the thumb. Hold the line in place on the reel by pressing the tip of the thumb against the line on the spool.
Step 3
Bring the tip of the rod back and to the side while maintaining pressure on the line so it does not unspool.
Step 4
Swing the rod back forward, but do not bring the tip past the target area on the water. As the tip of the rod nears the target, release the line by slightly raising the tip of the thumb. This will allow line to unspool.
Step 5
As the lure or practice plug drops to the target on the water, begin to reapply pressure to the line on the spool to prevent the line from overrunning and creating a birds nest or tangle.
Step 6
Maintain pressure on the spool with the thumb, and with the opposite turn the handle of the reel to engage the winding mechanism and begin to retrieve the lure or plug.

Tips & Warnings

 
Practice casting to a space, box, or hula hoop on dry land to learn hand and line control before heading to the water. Take your time when learning to use a baitcaster; it can become a source of frustration.
 
Practice casting to a space, box, or hula hoop on dry land to learn hand and line control before heading to the water.
 
Take your time when learning to use a baitcaster; it can become a source of frustration.
 
Make sure there is no one in the way to be struck by the rod or lure when casting.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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