How to Make Your Own Fishing Rod Rack

How to Make Your Own Fishing Rod Rack
A personally-made rack for fishing rods is a great project for any fisherman who has some tools and some time. Regardless of whether you want a rack for storage or for displaying your rod collection, a few simple materials and a little preparation are all you need. A well made, hand-crafted fishing rod rack is not only pleasant to look at, but keeps your rods conveniently stored and handy.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Saw Carpenter's pencil Tape measure Unfinished wooden curtain rod brackets Paint or stain 2-inch wood screws 3-inch wall screws At least one 1x6 board, 6 or 8 feet long Screwdriver
  • Saw
  • Carpenter's pencil
  • Tape measure
  • Unfinished wooden curtain rod brackets
  • Paint or stain
  • 2-inch wood screws
  • 3-inch wall screws
  • At least one 1x6 board, 6 or 8 feet long
  • Screwdriver
Step 1
Choose where your rod rack will hang. The space will need to be at least a foot wider than the rods you plan to display, as well as have at least four feet of vertical space.
Step 2
Determine how large your rack will be. Leave at least 6 inches between each of the rod brackets. Thus, if your brackets are 4 inches tall and your rack is to hold five rods, the finished rack will be 44 inches tall, with a bracket flush to the top and bottom.
Step 3
Cut the boards for the frame. The sizes will vary based on the number or rods you want to put on it.
Step 4
Mark the location of the brackets on the frame, using the above guidelines.
Step 5
Screw the brackets into the frame. If your brackets have self-installing hardware, ignore it. Drive two 2-inch screws through the frame into each bracket, making sure the screw heads are flush with the frame.
Step 6
Decorate your rack with the paint or stain of your choice.
Step 7
Mount the rack. Put a line on the wall at the top edge of where you wish the rack to hang and screw the rack into place using the line as a guide. How high you place the rack will vary depending on the size of your rack.

Tips & Warnings

 
Always wear protective gear when using power tools.

Article Written By Beau Prichard

Beau Prichard has been a freelance writer and editor since 1999. He specializes in fiction, travel and writing coaching. He has traveled in the United Kingdom, Europe, Mexico and Australia. Prichard grew up in New Zealand and holds a Bachelor of Arts in writing from George Fox University.

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