How to Tie Fly Fishing Flies

How to Tie Fly Fishing Flies
Tying flies is a pastime enjoyed by fly fishing anglers. Fly fishing flies have a recipe of materials that make up the fly pattern, and these materials can be altered or enhanced by anglers in order to make their own unique creation. With instruction, you can tie a classic Wolly Bugger fly.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Tying the Wolly Bugger

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fly tying vise Thread bobbin Scissors Thread Hook Marabou feathers Hackle feathers Chenille
  • Fly tying vise
  • Thread bobbin
  • Scissors
  • Thread
  • Hook
  • Marabou feathers
  • Hackle feathers
  • Chenille
Step 1
Start by placing the round bend portion of the hook in the fly tying vise. This will leave the eye of the hook pointing away from the vise.
Step 2
Place the thread in the thread bobbin and make sure the thread runs through the tube and out the top of the bobbin.
Step 3
Once the thread is ready, pinch the thread on the front of the hook and wind the bobbin around the hook. Repeat the windings until you reach the rear of the hook, just before the bend.
Step 4
Place a single marabou feather on the hook so half the feather hangs off the back and wind the thread up the hook, securing the feather in place. Wind the thread to the back of the hook so it's ready for the next step.
Step 5
Tie in the hackle feather by winding the thread around the tip of the feather. Add the chenille by tying it in above the hackle feather and wrapping the thread forward to the eye of the hook.
Step 6
With the chenille in place, wrap it around the hook until you reach the eye of the hook. Wrap the thread around the chenille to secure it and cut the excess chenille. Be careful not to cut the thread.
Step 7
Take the hackle feather and wrap it around the hook evenly to the eye of the hook. Then wrap the thread around the hackle, cut the excess feather, and make six to eight wraps of thread just below the eye of the hook.
Step 8
Finish the fly by adding a couple half hitches or loop knots at the eye of the hook and trim the thread.

Tips & Warnings

 
Black, brown and olive are standard colors, but try using bright colors like chartreuse or orange.
 
Be sure not to cut the thread until the final step, otherwise the materials will come loose during the process.

Resources

Article Written By Brian M. Kelly

Brian M. Kelly has been freelance writing since 2003. His work has been published in respected outdoor magazines such as Outdoor Life, Great Lakes Angler and Salmon Trout Steelheader. He holds an associate's degree in automated machine design from Macomb College.

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