How to Stop Swim Goggles From Fogging Up

How to Stop Swim Goggles From Fogging Up
Nothing is more irritating while you are trying to scan the riverbed for fish or sunken treasure than having to constantly remove your swim goggles due to fogging. Someday, a dedicated swimmer will come up with the perfect solution and retire quite wealthy. Until then, here are a few techniques.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • anti-fogging spray
  • anti-fogging spray
Step 1
Purchase goggles with anti-fog coating. Most goggles today come with this coating, particularly if you shop in sporting goods or outdoor stores and specialty outlets that focus on water sports such as surf and diving shops. Use care with these goggles to maximize the effectiveness of the coating. Suggestions include never rubbing the lenses in order to dry them as this can cause the coating to wear off.
Step 2
Try leaving a few drops of water in the goggles while you swim. Prior to putting on your goggles, give them a good swish around in the water to clean them of any debris. Allow two or three drops of water to remain in each off the lenses when you put them on. While you swim, this excess water will act like wipers across the lenses and keep the fogging to a minimum.
Step 3
Coat your goggles with anti-fog spray. If you have older goggles or want to provide upkeep on new ones, buy a small bottle of anti-fogging solution. You can find this at most outdoor stores or water sports specialty shops.
Step 4
Spit into your goggles. This is a time-honored tradition but doesn't seem to work for everybody. Give the goggles a good swish in the water, shake off any excess water and then spit into the lenses. Rub the saliva over the lenses. Repeat as necessary.

Tips & Warnings

 
Before putting your goggles on, let them sit in the water you'll be swimming in for several minutes. This will help bring them up to the same temperature as the water, which could delay fogging.

Article Written By Nikki Jardin

Nikki Jardin began freelance writing in 2009 and focuses on food and travel articles. She has been a professional cook and caterer for more than 20 years. She holds a degree in environmental science from Humboldt State University.

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