How to Set a Bird Trap

How to Set a Bird Trap
Whatever your reason for doing so, setting a bird trap in a humane manner can be relatively simple. All you need to do is follow a few simple steps. Most importantly, however, you need to be patient; prepare yourself for a process that may take up to a week, possibly longer. Let's take a look.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Bird trap Dried bread or other bird bait
  • Bird trap
  • Dried bread or other bird bait
Step 1
Purchase a bird trap. There are many types of bird traps commercially available. Most traps come in the form of a wire mesh cage. Some are double-door, allowing the birds to enter either side of the trap, while others are single-door. Some have slanted entrances, using the angle to prod the birds forward. Some bird traps are especially transportable--being either lightweight or collapsible. Select the appropriate bird trap, depending on the number of birds you wish to catch as well as the frequency you think you'll be using the trap.
Step 2
Observe the birds and make a note of their regular places of congregation. Be patient--trap location is paramount when it comes to trapping a bird. Select a spot for your trap based on these observations.
Step 3
Bait the area you've selected for your trap. Do this several days before you plan on setting out your bird trap. This will get the birds accustomed to congregating there. More importantly, they'll get used to turning to that area for food. Use dried bread, grain, or cereal as bait, spreading it out over around four- or five-square feet.
Step 4
After a few days, place your bird trap in the bird congregation spot that you've selected. Tie up the doors so that they can't close.
Step 5
Bait your trap. Be sure the area surrounding the trap is baited, too, but leave a good, thick trail of bait leading into the trap. Make sure the inside of the trap has a nice little pile of the stuff right in the middle. Since the doors are tied up, they won't shut. This is good, because you want the birds to get used to the trap for a few days.
Step 6
Once the birds have become used to the presence of the trap, untie the trap doors. Check the trap every few hours. The collapsible doors should close on the birds the minute they've entered the cage.

Tips & Warnings

 
Be sure to check your trap at least once a day; you don't want the poor birds stuck inside it for longer than that. If you aren't familiar with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, you should probably research the act before trapping migratory birds. In short, the act states that the trapping of migratory birds is prohibited by law.
 
Be sure to check your trap at least once a day; you don't want the poor birds stuck inside it for longer than that.
 
If you aren't familiar with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, you should probably research the act before trapping migratory birds. In short, the act states that the trapping of migratory birds is prohibited by law.

Article Written By William Jackson

William Jackson has written, reported and edited professionally for more than 10 years. His work has been published in newspapers, magazines, scholarly journals, high-level government reports, books and online. He holds a master's degree in humanities from Pennsylvania State University.

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