How to Keep Cold Foods From Getting Soggy During Camping

How to Keep Cold Foods From Getting Soggy During CampingSoggy cheese is a drag. So is soggy meat. And at the end of a long day out on the trail, coming back to the cooler to find your chocolate bar floating around, soggy, is worth shedding a tear over. You need to pack perishable foods in a cooler in order to keep them fresh and safe for eating. Thankfully, a number of ways exist that can help keep you from having to wring out your dinner.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Plastic bottles or milk jugs
  • Ziploc bags
  • Tupperware or plastic containers
 
Step 1
Instead of using bags of ice to keep your things cool, use plastic water bottles or milk jugs. Fill them with water and freeze them before placing them in the cooler. When they thaw, they won't leak all over the cooler causing a mess. Don't fill the jugs all the way to the top before freezing as this can cause the bottle to crack.
Step 2
Purchase dry ice. Dry ice must be handled carefully, but will keep food cold for a longer period of time. The beauty of dry ice is that it doesn't melt, it sublimates, which means it changes from a solid block to a gas, leaving a dry cooler. One drawback is that it may be hard to find once out on the road, but will work great to start off with and for shorter trips.
Step 3
Place food in Ziploc bags. If you must use bags of ice, place as many food items as you can in double- or triple-layered Ziploc bags. This will keep the water from getting into your cheese, salami, chocolate or vegetables. Tupperware or plastic containers also will work well for this purpose.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Chill perishable foods before placing them in the cooler. This helps maintain the efficiency of the cooler. Use two ice chests: one for snacks and drinks and the other for holding items used for large meals. Wrap your cooler in a blanket or sleeping bag for better insulation.
 
Chill perishable foods before placing them in the cooler. This helps maintain the efficiency of the cooler.
 
Use two ice chests: one for snacks and drinks and the other for holding items used for large meals.
 
Wrap your cooler in a blanket or sleeping bag for better insulation.
 
Never touch dry ice with your bare hands--always use gloves or tongs.

Article Written By Nikki Jardin

Nikki Jardin began freelance writing in 2009 and focuses on food and travel articles. She has been a professional cook and caterer for more than 20 years. She holds a degree in environmental science from Humboldt State University.

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