How to Travel in Switzerland

How to Travel in Switzerland
Switzerland is one of the easiest places to travel in within Europe. An efficient and organized network of bike paths, motorways, train lines, cable cars and hiking routes means that travelers have a choice when it comes to deciding how to travel. Opt to travel by car, bike, public transport or on foot. This is one of the few places in the world where a car is virtually unnecessary and can sometimes be more of a hindrance than a help.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Map of Switzerland
  • Map of Switzerland
Step 1
Because of Switzerland's compact size and excellent public transport system, internal air travel is of limited interest to most visitors. However, Swiss International Airlines serves the major cities.
Step 2
The Swiss public transportation is extensive and reaches even the remotest mountain villages. Trains, boats, cable cars and mountain railways efficiently work together. This is one of the most scenic and relaxing ways to travel in Switzerland.
Step 3
If traveling by car, you will need to buy a "vignette," a sticker that goes on the vehicle's windshield, to drive on the motorways. As of August 2009, this costs 40 CHF ($38) and is valid for unlimited travel for one calendar year. The vignette can be purchased at the Swiss border, gas stations, post offices and online. Swiss roads are well-kept and well-marked. The only downside to driving is that the driver often misses the scenic views.
Step 4
An extensive network of long-distance bicycle trails across Switzerland makes biking an exciting option. Routes and information can be found online. For smaller journeys, consider renting bikes at a train station. Once you are finished cycling you simply return the bike to the nearest station. Electric and regular bikes can be rented in most Swiss cities.
Step 5
Switzerland is a hiker's paradise and the extensive network of trails means that you can spend months discovering Switzerland on foot. Trekkers typically stay in one of the 300 mountain refuges that are operated by the Swiss Mountain Club, because wild camping isn't really allowed.

Tips & Warnings

 
Three, five and 10-day itineraries by car or train can be found online at http://www.myswitzerland.com/en.cfm/travel/trips. Download free travel brochures at myswitzerland.com.
 
Three, five and 10-day itineraries by car or train can be found online at http://www.myswitzerland.com/en.cfm/travel/trips.
 
Download free travel brochures at myswitzerland.com.
 
Driving in the mountains typically involves driving through tunnels, over mountain passes and on narrow windy roads. Prior experience is recommended. Parking can be difficult to find in the major cities. Traveling by train can be expensive. Research rail pass information prior to departure.
 
Driving in the mountains typically involves driving through tunnels, over mountain passes and on narrow windy roads. Prior experience is recommended.
 
Parking can be difficult to find in the major cities.
 
Traveling by train can be expensive. Research rail pass information prior to departure.

Article Written By Alexandra Pallut

Alexandra Pallut is a travel, health and fitness writer based in Steamboat Springs, Colo. She has been writing her way around the world since 2008 and currently works with Ruba.com. Pallut graduated with a degree in English literature and French language from Lancaster University in Great Britain.

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