Equine First-Aid Kit Checklist

Equine First-Aid Kit Checklist
No matter how careful you are when riding in the backcountry, the unexpected sometimes occurs. Keeping a well-stocked equine first-aid kit easily accessible on your trail rides will ensure that you're properly prepared for an accident. Prepackaged kits are available at your local tack store, but you can easily put one together yourself.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Carrying case Antibiotic soap Wound sponge Antibiotic ointment Vetrap 1- to 2-inch-wide self-adhesive tape Gauze pads Sanitary napkins or disposable diapers Resealable waste bag Multi-tool Thermometer Stethoscope Lubricant Furacin spray Bute or Banamine paste
  • Carrying case
  • Antibiotic soap
  • Wound sponge
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Vetrap
  • 1- to 2-inch-wide self-adhesive tape
  • Gauze pads
  • Sanitary napkins or disposable diapers
  • Resealable waste bag
  • Multi-tool
  • Thermometer
  • Stethoscope
  • Lubricant
  • Furacin spray
  • Bute or Banamine paste
Step 1
Find a durable, medium-sized carrying case that you can easily pack into your saddlebags without taking up too much space.
Step 2
Seal liquid antibiotic soaps such as Betadine or chlorhexidine in a plastic bag to prevent spills while on the trail. Many riders prefer to use a presoaked Betadine sponge that is ready to use for cleaning wounds. You may also want to include antibiotic ointment in the resealable bag.
Step 3
Add self-adhesive bandaging such as Vetrap, 1- to 2-inch-wide adhesive tape and gauze pads for minor cuts and abrasions. Sanitary napkins or disposable diapers make ideal pressure pads when trying to stop excessive bleeding.
Step 4
Consolidate heavy items by picking tools that serve a variety of functions. Consider packing a multi-tool that contains a pair of scissors, knife and other handy gadgets. When riding in the backcountry also consider carrying a thermometer, lubricant and a stethoscope to monitor the horse's vital signs as needed.
Step 5
Pack smaller items toward the top of your first aid kit for easy access. Additional items to consider are chemical ice packs, Furacin spray for wounds that should remain unwrapped, and bute or Banamine paste to alleviate inflammation.
Step 6
Consult a veterinarian about other medications you should keep in your first aid kit.
Step 7
Establish a list of emergency numbers, including the nearest veterinarian. Keep this list in your first aid kit along with a pen and an extra sheet of paper.

Tips & Warnings

 
Check your equine first-aid kit for expired contents on a regular basis. Consider the area in which you will be traveling. The farther you are from definitive care, the more prepared and comprehensive your kit should be.
 
Check your equine first-aid kit for expired contents on a regular basis.
 
Consider the area in which you will be traveling. The farther you are from definitive care, the more prepared and comprehensive your kit should be.
 
Store your kit at room temperature when you are not on the trail.

Article Written By Patricia Poulin

Patricia Poulin is a freelance writer based out of the western slope of Colorado. Poulin's travels and insight have chronicled in print media resources, such as "Inside Outside" and "Breathe" magazine. She is also a regular contributor for other various publications including "USA Today." Poulin holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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