How to Learn to Scuba Dive

How to Learn to Scuba Dive
Scuba diving is an adventurous recreational sport, but it is also complicated and gear-intensive, and involves some specialized skills. No one can simply put on some scuba equipment, jump in the water and expect to dive safely. Learning to dive properly requires both classroom and dive training work.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Step 1
Draw up a list of all scuba diving schools in your area, and note their affiliation. The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) is the largest, but there are also the National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI), Scuba Schools International (SSI) and others. Even the YMCA has a national scuba program.
Step 2
Compare prices and course schedules and pick out the Open Water (OW) program that suits you best. The requirements of each organization and its OW course vary, but they all offer competent training and all their certificates are widely accepted.
Step 3
Take the course work seriously. It will teach you how pressure affects the body, how to use diving-pressure tables and other essential information.
Step 4
Develop your skills during the confined water dives. Depending on the program, there will be between three and seven of these dives. Fundamental skills like purging water from a diving mask, getting scuba gear on and off underwater and practicing emergency ascents will be covered.
Step 5
Solidify your diving skills with OW dives. PADI programs require four closely supervised class dives on real dive sites before an OW certificate is issued. Under PADI, these can be done with your class or at another PADI dive school, so you can complete your OW certification while on a diving vacation. The other programs require this to be done under close supervision and with your class, but may require fewer dives. NAUI requires only two OW dives. Supervised OW dives mix real recreational diving with field practice of the skills learned in Step 4's confined water dives.

Tips & Warnings

 
Many diving sites in Southeast Asia combine first-rate sites with cheap prices and dive schools staffed mostly by instructors from Western countries. Do not worry about buying gear. It is routine for students to use rented equipment during their OW training, and this is often included in the cost of the course.
 
Many diving sites in Southeast Asia combine first-rate sites with cheap prices and dive schools staffed mostly by instructors from Western countries.
 
Do not worry about buying gear. It is routine for students to use rented equipment during their OW training, and this is often included in the cost of the course.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

Don't Miss a Thing!

All our latest outdoor content delivered to your inbox once a week.

FREE UPDATES

Subscribe

We promise to keep your email address safe and secure.