How to Scuba Dive

How to Scuba Dive
Scuba diving has been gaining momentum as a popular recreational sport since Jacques Cousteau helped invent the Aqualung and started making documentaries. It is now pursued around the world, granting many access to undersea adventures.

However, the pursuit of scuba diving is very gear intensive, requires training and has several key concepts to keep in mind.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Wetsuit Dive mask Swim fins Weight belt Regulator Air cylinder Buoyancy control device Open water training (minimum)
  • Wetsuit
  • Dive mask
  • Swim fins
  • Weight belt
  • Regulator
  • Air cylinder
  • Buoyancy control device
  • Open water training (minimum)
Step 1
Release the air from your buoyancy control device (BCD) so you can descend. This is usually done by pushing the button on the BCD's control valve, but there are emergency release valves on every BCD that can be opened by pulling a release cord.
Step 2
Equalize the pressure in the air spaces in your head as you descend in depth. Failure to do this will result in pain in the ears, then probably injury. This is usually done by clamping the nose shut with the fingers and blowing gently through the nose, forcing more air into the head's cavities. Those who have difficulty can do a bigger equalization by swallowing spit or even sea water, pushing a lot of air into those cavities.
Step 3
Equalize the pressure on the air space inside the dive mask as well. This is done by simply blowing air into the mask through your nose until the water pressure stops pushing the mask onto your face. Excess air will dribble out of the mask in micro-bubbles.
Step 4
Swim with your arms tucked in, to minimize drag. Only use your legs for propulsion, and keep them behind your shoulders to also minimize drag.
Step 5
Remember not to overexert yourself, and breath normally. Dive time is directly related to controlling how much air you use, so exertions that cause you to breath hard or become overexcited cut down your dive time.
Step 6
Check the pressure gauge on your regulator regularly, to monitor depth and keep an eye on how much air is left in your tank.
Step 7
Keep your buddy in sight at all times, and never lose track of your location on the dive site. It is easy to lose your buddy and get lost if you don't pay attention.
Step 8
Make a safety stop of at least three minutes at a depth of 20 feet before returning to the surface. This is recommended for most dives, and strongly for dives that are below 100 feet.

Tips & Warnings

 
The basic certification of Open Water (OW) requires approximately 35 to 40 hours of coursework, plus several supervised training dives. This guide should in no way be taken as a substitute for that training. Recreational scuba divers should never exceed 140 feet of depth. Lower depths require technical dive training and specialized gas mixes.
 
The basic certification of Open Water (OW) requires approximately 35 to 40 hours of coursework, plus several supervised training dives. This guide should in no way be taken as a substitute for that training.
 
Recreational scuba divers should never exceed 140 feet of depth. Lower depths require technical dive training and specialized gas mixes.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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