How to Scuba Dive in Arona, Italy

How to Scuba Dive in Arona, Italy
Arona, Italy, is not often found on anyone's list of a top place to go scuba diving. However, the recent success of technical divers in reaching the wreck of the Milano has attracted some modest attention to the area, and it does have its attractions for divers. Arona it is home to an active (if small) diving community, because nearby Lake Maggiore and its 985 foot depths offer some golden opportunities for freshwater diving.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Trip Planning

Things You’ll Need:
  • PADI's Open Water (OW) certification or the equivalent is recommended
  • PADI's Open Water (OW) certification or the equivalent is recommended
Step 1
Talk with Maggiore Diving. They are located in Cannobio, near the San Bartolomeo resort, and are a good source for diving information, organized trips and rental gear in the area.
Step 2
Choose between joining an organized dive trip through Maggiore Diving, or going independently using information provided by them. The organized trips are limited to weekends, so if you wish to dive during the week it will have to be independently. This will require renting a boat.
Step 3
Prepare your equipment. If you did not bring any (or own any), you will need to rent it all from Maggiore Diving. However, even a fully equipped diver will need to stop in and get their air tanks filled.

Freshwater Diving

Step 1
Compare the local water temperature to your wet suit. Freshwater diving often means dramatic and frigid thermoclines. Even the surface layer of water is likely to be pretty cold, even in summer, due to the proximity to the Alps. It may prove necessary to rent a thicker suit or even a dry suit for safety.
Step 2
Subtract weights from your belt. Freshwater is less buoyant than saltwater, so you won't need as much weight to achieve neutral buoyancy.
Step 3
Get a waterproof headlamp and waterproof flashlight. Both are normal for night diving. Freshwater dives involve low visibility, and even moderate depths can get murky and dark. Lights will almost always prove handy.
Step 4
Remember that Arona and the lake are at 656 feet above sea level, so include that when doing decompression calculations.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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