How to Remove Water From Ears After Swimming

How to Remove Water From Ears After Swimming
Water that stays in the ear after swimming can be uncomfortable as well as dangerous. Moisture in the ear creates a favorable environment for bacteria growth and infection. Plus, if the water in which you swam was polluted, as some lakes and rivers are, there's even more risk of infection. Water in the ear could lead to an ear infection commonly called "swimmer's ear" (acute external otitis). If you get such an infection, it will take time, and probably antibiotics, to restore you to health and get you back in the water.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Towel Hair dryer Warm-air ear dryer Vinegar (acetic acid) Rubbing alcohol Swim cap (optional) Cotton balls (optional) Ear plugs (optional)
  • Towel
  • Hair dryer
  • Warm-air ear dryer
  • Vinegar (acetic acid)
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Swim cap (optional)
  • Cotton balls (optional)
  • Ear plugs (optional)
Step 1
Drain your ears when you leave the water. Remove your swim cap (if wearing one), tilt your head and tap it gently.
Step 2
Dry your outer ear with a towel and your ear canal with warm air from a hair dryer. Use only the slowest fan setting and lowest heat.
Step 3
Buy a commercial warm-air ear dryer if you often have trouble with water in your ears or experience frequent ear infections.
Step 4
Try a home remedy of equal amounts of white vinegar and rubbing alcohol. Tilt your head to one side, drip several drops into the ear facing upward, let the solution sit in your ear canal for a few seconds and then tilt your head the other way so that the ear may drain. Repeat with the second ear. Alcohol and vinegar kill some germs and also disturb water's surface tension, encouraging trapped water to exit.

Tips & Warnings

 
Clean water fosters fewer organisms, reducing the likelihood of ear and other infections. To minimize the amount of water that gets into your ears, place a small cotton ball in each outer ear and then put on a tight-fitting swimming cap before going into the water.
 
Clean water fosters fewer organisms, reducing the likelihood of ear and other infections.
 
To minimize the amount of water that gets into your ears, place a small cotton ball in each outer ear and then put on a tight-fitting swimming cap before going into the water.
 
Do not stick foreign objects, even ear swabs, deeply into your ears. Be alert for itchy or sore ears. At the first sign, squeeze the oil from a garlic clove into a small amount of olive oil and put a drop or two in each ear. If your symptoms worsen, seek a health professional's advice. Remember not to swim until about ten days after an ear infection's last symptom disappears.
 
Do not stick foreign objects, even ear swabs, deeply into your ears.
 
Be alert for itchy or sore ears. At the first sign, squeeze the oil from a garlic clove into a small amount of olive oil and put a drop or two in each ear. If your symptoms worsen, seek a health professional's advice.
 
Remember not to swim until about ten days after an ear infection's last symptom disappears.

Resources

Article Written By Lani Johnson

Lani Johnson is a hiking, writing musician. Recent published work includes journalism, poetry and research. See her online writing at Trails.com or at Azacda.presspublisher.us.

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