How to Camp in the Grand Tetons

How to Camp in the Grand Tetons
The Grand Tetons are among the most frequently climbed mountains in the world, and all those climbers must travel cross-country and backcountry areas to make their ascents. In addition, the abundant wildlife and gorgeous scenery make Grand Teton National Park a very popular camping destination. With a little planning, it is easy to have a great camping trip there.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Fees and Permits

Things You’ll Need:
  • Admission pass
  • Camping equipment
 
Step 1
Pay the park admission fee.
Step 2
Make reservations for either Flagg Ranch or Coulter Bay if you are RV camping. RV space is limited, camping at Grand Teton National Park is popular and reservations are strongly recommended.
Step 3
Pick between frontcountry or primitive, backcounty camping if you are using a tent. Note that due to the cross-country hiking necessary for climbers to reach their starting points in the Tetons, all climbers automatically become backcountry campers as well.
Step 4
Choose between Gros Ventre, Jenny Lake, Lizard Creek and Signal Mountain campgrounds for frontcountry camping. Jenny Lake is the most popular of these, and reservations are recommended for anyone planning to camp there.
Step 5
Make a reservation for a backcountry camping permit between Jan. 1 and May 15 of the year you intend to visit Grand Teton park. The park is divided into zones, and every zone has a quota for the number of backcountry campers permitted there at a given time. Two-thirds of the permits are given out on a first-come, first-serve system with registration required the day before the backcountry hike is supposed to start. The remaining third are by reservation only. 

Safety

Step 1
Keep your food in bear-safe containers at all times. Be sure to make plenty of noise when hiking in those parts of the park where a bear encounter is likely, and carry around bear-strength pepper spray. Never run from a bear, even if they charge you.
Step 2
Stay on the marked trails as much as possible, to help prevent soil erosion.
Step 3
Exercise "leave no trace" practices at all times. Do not build temporary walls from local stones, for example. Backcountry campers should pack out all trash.
Step 4
Build campfires using dead and down wood only. Using a portable camp stove instead is recommended, and fires can be started in designated areas only.
Step 5
Use proper sanitation techniques by digging latrines and burying solid human waste downhill from and a minimum of 100 feet from water sources. Treat local water sources for drinking by using the two-step procedure of first sanitizing, then filtering it.
 

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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