How to Fish With Rubber Worms

How to Fish With Rubber Worms
Many anglers will only fish a rubber worm when it is Texas-rigged. Although this method is successful, many people lack the patience to meticulously cast the rubber worm into heavy weeds and slowly reel it in. But you don't need a lot of persistence to make a rubber worm an effective member of your lure arsenal.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Rod and reel
  • Rubber worms
  • Offset worm hooks
  • Worm weights
 
Step 1
Rig your worm Texas-style if you choose (see Resources). You can also rig it similarly, but rather than bringing the point out a half-inch from where it enters the top of the worm, you can thread the worm on the length of the shaft and let the point come out much farther down the side. Do not bury the hook in the worm like a Texas rig, but allow it to stay outside the body.
Step 2
Cast the rubber worm in a sidearm motion so it lands under overhanging branches. Allow it to sink a few feet but not hit the bottom. Reel it in at medium speed and be prepared for a strike from fish such as bass, pike and pickerel.
Step 3
Target patches of lily pads in ponds and lakes and target with your rubber worm. Cast into the open areas between them and to the fringes just in front of them. Reel in at a moderate pace as soon as the rubber worm hits the water. Keep your rod tip up and in position to pull back for a hookset.
Step 4
Fish your rubber worms around docks and boathouses, which fish will use as shade. Cast right onto a vacant dock and pull the lure off it. Let it sink close to the bottom before reeling in. Cast under docks if there is enough room. Be ready for a quick hit once you start to retrieve the rubber worm.
Step 5
Identify the shallowest water you feel holds fish and make several casts into it. If there is grass or light weeds in the water, cast into this cover and slowly bring the rubber worm back. Watch behind your worm for any ripples or the wake of an advancing fish.
Step 6
Be prepared to set the hook even when the rubber worm is almost back to you. Species such as pike and its close cousin, the pickerel, are notorious for hitting a rubber worm right before you take it out of the water.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Keep checking your rubber worm to make sure the hook is secure. Replace worms that have their tails chewed off by hungry fish. The action a worm gets from its tail as it is reeled in makes it attractive to fish.
 
Keep checking your rubber worm to make sure the hook is secure.
 
Replace worms that have their tails chewed off by hungry fish. The action a worm gets from its tail as it is reeled in makes it attractive to fish.

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