How to Tie Double Fishing Line

How to Tie Double Fishing Line
When targeting tackle-busting fish, big-game fishers like using a long section of double-line as added protection against line breakage. Once a few turns of the double-line are on the reel, the angler can effectively apply twice the pressure as with a single line. During this critical phase of releasing or gaffing a fish, the double-line can be the difference between landing and losing a trophy. The Bimini Twist knot is commonly used to make a strong double-line.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fishing line Nail clippers Helper
  • Fishing line
  • Nail clippers
  • Helper
Step 1
Make a doubled section of line about 4 feet long. Grasp the standing line and the tag end in one hand. Place the other hand inside the loop and make 20 revolutions.
Step 2
Sit down and draw your knees close together. Place the loop over your knees. Continue holding the standing line and the tag end while spreading your knees. This will cause the wraps to tighten against each other.
Step 3
When the wraps are tight, lightly relax pressure on the tag end. Pull downward and let the tag end form new loops all the way to the bottom of the original loops.
Step 4
Take the tag end and make one half-hitch around one strand of the loop. Make three half-hitches around both strands of the loop. Snugly tighten and trim the tag end 1/8-inch from the knot.

Tips & Warnings

 
The illustrations do not show the knees. Assume that they are inside the loop. Keep constant tension on the lines in the directions shown. When tying longer sections of double-line, use the helper to hold one end of the line.
 
The illustrations do not show the knees. Assume that they are inside the loop.
 
Keep constant tension on the lines in the directions shown.
 
When tying longer sections of double-line, use the helper to hold one end of the line.

Article Written By Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray has been writing for over 15 years. He has been published in "Florida Sportsman" magazine. He holds an FAA airframe and powerplant license and FCC radiotelephone license, and is also a licensed private pilot. He attended the University of South Florida.

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