How To Use a Jig for Fishing

How To Use a Jig for Fishing
If a fisherman could have only have one artificial lure in his tackle box, a jig would likely rank near the top of the list. Jigs are versatile and can be used in fresh and saltwater. Jigs come in a variety of shapes and sizes that allow them to be used in different situations and many species of fish will readily strike a jig. Learning how to use a jig for fishing will increase your skill level and can help make your fishing excursions more successful.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Nylon jig Bucktail jig Metallic jig Pork rind Cut bait Berkley Gulp jig bodies Popping cork
  • Nylon jig
  • Bucktail jig
  • Metallic jig
  • Pork rind
  • Cut bait
  • Berkley Gulp jig bodies
  • Popping cork
Step 1
Use a "jig-and-pig" to target freshwater fish. Named after the pork rind strip that is hooked to the jig, this setup is famous for catching largemouth bass. Look for bass near underwater structures. Cast your "jig-and-pig" and let it sink to the bottom. Retrieve the jig at a slow-to-medium speed for a foot or so, then make the jig hop by twitching the rod tip. Repeat until a bass is caught.
Step 2
Target saltwater game fish by using a metallic or nylon jig. Troll with these jigs near schools of feeding game fish. Use a metal leader for toothy fish such as kingfish or mackerel.
Step 3
Deep jig fish for reef species such as grouper and snapper. Use a large bucktail or nylon jig tipped with cut bait or squid. Let the jig drop straight down to the ocean's bottom. Quickly raise the rod tip and then let the jig flutter back down. Repeat until a fish strikes.
Step 4
Catch sea trout by using a jig head with a rubber body. Berkley Gulp baits are popular for this use as they feel and smell like actual bait. Rig your jig under a popping cork. Set your jig to the desired depth. Cast the jig and rapidly "pop" the cork at regular intervals. The noisy splashing will attract sea trout and other desirable fish.

Tips & Warnings

 
Use a loop knot when attaching your jig to the line. This knot will give the jig a more lifelike movement.
 
Use caution when working around hooks. Always wear a life vest when on the water.
 
Use caution when working around hooks.
 
Always wear a life vest when on the water.

Article Written By Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray has been writing for over 15 years. He has been published in "Florida Sportsman" magazine. He holds an FAA airframe and powerplant license and FCC radiotelephone license, and is also a licensed private pilot. He attended the University of South Florida.

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