How to Use a Flatfish Trout Lure

How to Use a Flatfish Trout LureFlatfish lures have been used to catch trout for decades and continue to produce trophy fish today. These lures have unique properties that need to be understood in order to harness their fish-attracting power.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

How to:

Things You’ll Need:
  • Spinning or casting rod
  • Flatfish lures
 
Step 1
When using a flatfish lure for trout, it is imperative the line you have on your reel is strong enough to handle the violent strikes this lure will elicit. In small streams, 8-pound test will work fine, but be sure to use heavier lines like 10- or 12-pound test on larger rivers.
Step 2
While flatfish have a wide wobbling action that provoke trout to strike, the lures may not dive deep enough into the trout's lair. Add a piece of split-shot or two 6 to 8 inches above the flatfish. This extra weight will help bring the lure down in the water and help you add casting distance.
Step 3
Flatfish work best in slower holes or back eddies where big trout like to hide. Position your cast so the lure lands at one side of the holding water and slowly reel to put tension on the line. This will get the flatfish to begin its famous wiggle in the current.
Step 4
As the lure begins to swing across the width of the hole, make sure you do not reel too fast; this will cause the lure to flip over and spin out of control. Flatfish work best on a slow retrieve. Depending on the current of the river, you may not have to reel in any line until the lure has swung all the way across the hole.

Tips & Warnings

 
Be sure to check your knots when using a flatfish for trout. The lure can break off on the strike with a weak knot. Keep your rod low to the water. This will help get the lure down to the proper depth and help control the lure as it swings across the current.
 
Be sure to check your knots when using a flatfish for trout. The lure can break off on the strike with a weak knot.
 
Keep your rod low to the water. This will help get the lure down to the proper depth and help control the lure as it swings across the current.

Article Written By Brian M. Kelly

Brian M. Kelly has been freelance writing since 2003. His work has been published in respected outdoor magazines such as Outdoor Life, Great Lakes Angler and Salmon Trout Steelheader. He holds an associate's degree in automated machine design from Macomb College.

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