How to Make Equipment for Jug Fishing

How to Make Equipment for Jug Fishing
Catching catfish with a jug is fun and productive. Jug fishing allows you to cover a large area with many hooks. Simply throw out your jugs and leave. Check your lines later in the day for fish. Equipment for jug fishing can be easily made for little cost. A quick look around your garage or shed should yield a few items from which to fashion equipment for jug fishing. Since jugs can easily be lost or sometimes stolen, it makes sense to use the least expensive equipment possible.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

How to Make Equipment for Jug Fishing

Things You’ll Need:
  • Empty 2-liter pop bottles Empty milk containers Swimming noodle Brick Scrap metal Hooks 3-way swivels Heavy twine 50- pound test monofilament Catfish bait Concrete, Small plastic cups
  • Empty 2-liter pop bottles
  • Empty milk containers
  • Swimming noodle
  • Brick
  • Scrap metal
  • Hooks
  • 3-way swivels
  • Heavy twine
  • 50- pound test monofilament
  • Catfish bait
  • Concrete,
  • Small plastic cups
Step 1
Make anchors for jug fishing from just about any object that is small and heavy. Scrap metal or bricks work fine, as long as the twine can be securely fastened to the object. Fashion anchors from concrete using a small plastic cup as a mold.
Step 2
Make floats for your jug fishing from just about anything that floats, including gallon milk containers and 2-liter pop bottles. Paint these floats if more visibility is desired. Cutting a swimming noodle in half will make an excellent jug fishing float.
Step 3
Rig a drifting jug by attaching a lightweight anchor to a short section of twine. Ensure that the twine is short enough so that it will not touch the bottom of where you are fishing. Cut the line and tie on one or two three-way swivels. Run short sections of monofilament with hooks to each swivel. Complete this rig by attaching a jug of your choice.
Step 4
Rig a stationary jug by first attaching a heavy anchor to a length of twine that will reach the bottom of where you are fishing. Add 5 to 10 feet of extra line and add a couple of three-way swivels. Rig each swivel with a short section of monofilament and a hook. Affix your float and this rig is complete.

Tips & Warnings

 
Consult local fishing regulations for all laws pertaining to jug fishing.
 
Use extreme caution when working around hooks. Always wear life vests when boating.
 
Use extreme caution when working around hooks.
 
Always wear life vests when boating.

Article Written By Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray has been writing for over 15 years. He has been published in "Florida Sportsman" magazine. He holds an FAA airframe and powerplant license and FCC radiotelephone license, and is also a licensed private pilot. He attended the University of South Florida.

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