How to Clean a Pocket Knife

How to Clean a Pocket Knife
Carrying a pocket knife everyday will cause wear and tear and the knife will get dirty. Regular cleaning and lubrication is important in order to keep your pocket knife in top condition. Without periodic care, your pocket knife may fail to function correctly and the blade may even develop rust. A clean and well cared for pocket knife will last for decades and will always be ready for use when needed.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

How to Clean a Pocket Knife

Things You’ll Need:
  • Cotton swabs Old toothbrush Toothpicks Soft clean rag Steel wool grade 0000 Metal Brite Dishwashing liquid Sponge 3-in-1 Oil
  • Cotton swabs
  • Old toothbrush
  • Toothpicks
  • Soft clean rag
  • Steel wool grade 0000
  • Metal Brite
  • Dishwashing liquid
  • Sponge
  • 3-in-1 Oil
Step 1
Open the knife blade and lock if possible. Use toothpicks, toothbrush and cotton swabs to clean and pick out lint and debris from the blade channel. Pay close attention to all the cracks, crevices and any other areas where dirt may collect.
Step 2
Clean and remove dirt and grime from the blade. Run warm tap water and use the dishwashing liquid and sponge to gently scrub the blade. Try not to immerse the entire knife in the water. Dry blade with the dry rag. Use compressed air to thoroughly dry the entire knife if you were unable to keep it dry.
Step 3
Gently scrub the scales with the toothbrush. Use a toothpick to pick out debris from the jigging in the scales. Wipe thoroughly with the dry rag when finished.
Step 4
Inspect the blade for rust. Discoloration is an early indication of rust. Add a drop of oil to any rust spots and lightly scrub with the steel wool. Use a polish like Metal Brite for stubborn rust spots.
Step 5
Apply a small drop of oil to the pivot point or joint. Lightly wipe the blade with a thin coat of oil. Store in a dry area when not carrying your pocket knife.

Tips & Warnings

 
Any type of moisture displacing oil will work for lubricating your knife.
 
Work slowly and patiently when cleaning your pocket knife in order to prevent injuries or damage to your pocket knife.

Article Written By Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray has been writing for over 15 years. He has been published in "Florida Sportsman" magazine. He holds an FAA airframe and powerplant license and FCC radiotelephone license, and is also a licensed private pilot. He attended the University of South Florida.

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