How to Set Your Snowboard Bindings

How to Set Your Snowboard Bindings
The set of your snowboard bindings creates your stance on your snowboard and greatly affects the way you ride. Play around with a few different settings and see what works best for you during everyday riding. You should also adjust your bindings, depending on the terrain you are riding. Powder snow and park riding, for example, require different binding settings. Invest in a snowboard tool to keep in your jacket on the mountain.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Snowboard tool
  • Snowboard tool
Step 1
Stand on the deck of your board before you mount the plates of your bindings. Bend your knees and see where your feet feel comfortable. Your feet should be set a bit wider than your shoulders.
Step 2
Mount your bindings slightly back toward the tail of your board. This allows greater control over your board for all-mountain riding and especially powder riding.
Step 3
Examine your bindings to find the small numbers. Each number represents a degree of the angle of your foot.
Step 4
Match the number that represents the number of degrees you want in the angle of your feet with the zero setting (represented by a zero or an arrow) on your base plate. This offset creates the angle.
Step 5
Make sure the front bindings are pointed at a positive angle, facing downhill, between 10 and 30 degrees forward. Your back foot may be mounted positive for aggressive downhill carving, or negative for better overall control and turning maneuvers where you may want to end up riding "switch."

Tips & Warnings

 
A typical all-mountain binding setup is positive 15 to 22 degrees on your front foot, negative 6 to 10 degrees on your back foot.

Article Written By Caroline Schley

Based in New York City, Caroline Schley has been writing articles on fitness, social interaction and politics since 2008. Her articles have appeared in "The Tahoe Weekly," "Second Line News" and websites, including Eatthestate.org. Schley graduated from CU Boulder in 2005 with a degree in environmental science.

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