How to Change the Bulb on a Streamlight Stinger DS LED Flashlight

How to Change the Bulb on a Streamlight Stinger DS LED FlashlightThe Streamlight Stinger DS LED flashlight operates with an LED bulb, exponentially brighter than incandescent bulb style flashlights. LED bulbs are dense, hard pieces of glass that use a magnification process to burn brighter while using less battery power. LED bulbs last longer than other styles of lights, but do require changes from time to time.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Step 1
Spread the towel on a flat surface, like a kitchen or workshop counter. Remove the battery cap on the back of the flashlight by unscrewing the battery casing. Remove the batteries. Set the cap and batteries aside.
Step 2
Remove the reflector casing on the front of the flashlight, where the LED bulb is housed. Unscrew the casing to the left and remove. Shake the flashlight upside down over the towel to remove any broken glass from the bulb from the casing.
Step 3
Grab the remaining LED bulb from the bulb holder using the needle nose pliers. Throw the old LED bulb away and shake out the broken glass off the towel into a wastebasket.
Step 4
Pick up the new LED bulb by its base, using needle nose pliers. Place the LED bulb into the housing in the reflector casing. Push the tow pins on the base of the LED bulb into the pin holes in the reflector casing. This is where the electric current flows into the LED bulb. Gently push down on the bulb with your finger to make sure it is set and firm in position.
Step 5
Screw the reflector cap back on, turning it to the right to tighten. Put the batteries back into the flashlight, and screw the battery cap back into position by turning it to the right until tight.
 

Article Written By Eric Cedric

A former Alaskan of 20 years, Eric Cedric now resides in California. He's published in "Outside" and "Backpacker" and has written a book on life in small-town Alaska, "North by Southeast." Cedric was a professional mountain guide and backcountry expedition leader for 18 years. He worked in Russia, Iceland, Greece, Turkey and Belize. Cedric attended Syracuse University and is a private pilot.

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