How to Paint Fishing Nets

How to Paint Fishing Nets
Your fishing nets represent time, money or both. If you have made your own nets or invested in the purchase of fishing nets, you do not want to get them mixed up with other anglers' nets. Custom paint your nets with a symbol, number, color scheme or design to easily spot them in crowded fishing waters. If your net has been retired, paint it for wall decor. The process for painting fishing nets takes a few days, as you need to allot time for the paint to dry.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fishing nets
  • Drop cloth
  • Acrylic spray paints
  • Hook screws
  • Large cardboard box or sheet of cardboard
  • Staple gun
  • Patterns or stencils
  • Sponges and cloth rags
Step 1
Set your drop cloth down in the area you will be painting the net. Stand a cardboard box on the drop cloth, or if you use a cardboard sheet, position it against a wall. Be sure to have the ground cloth over the wall and secured via staples, so the wall does not get painted along with the net.
Step 2
Screw the two hook screws into the upper left and upper right-hand corners of the cardboard sheet or on one side of the box. Hang one corner of the net on each hook so the net hangs evenly over the cardboard surface.
Step 3
Place you stencils or patterns over the net and staple the stencil or pattern to the cardboard. Try to hook at least one or two net threads with each staple. This locks the net into position. Choose your color scheme and visualize how you want the colors over the stencils or patterns.
Step 4
Shake each color of spray paint you use and spray into the stencil or pattern accordingly. Take care not to spray too much on to avoid drips and blobs. Be ready with a sponge and cloth towel to handle any drips quickly.
Step 5
Let the net and paint dry and remove the stencils and patterns. Remove the net from the cardboard.

Article Written By Eric Cedric

A former Alaskan of 20 years, Eric Cedric now resides in California. He's published in "Outside" and "Backpacker" and has written a book on life in small-town Alaska, "North by Southeast." Cedric was a professional mountain guide and backcountry expedition leader for 18 years. He worked in Russia, Iceland, Greece, Turkey and Belize. Cedric attended Syracuse University and is a private pilot.

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