Fishing Hook Tips

Fishing Hook Tips
A fishing hook on the end of the line can often be one of the more overlooked pieces of tackle used during a fishing trip. Through ordinary use, hooks can come loose from the fishing line as well as become damaged and dull, resulting in missed hook sets when a fish strikes. A few simple steps help identify and correct hook issues that can result in a disappointing day of fishing.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fish hook
  • Fishing line
  • Scissors
  • Hook hone
 
Step 1
Hold the hook by the bend. Inspect the hook looking for rust, any bending in the shank of the hook, damage to the barb or a bent point. Check the hook for sharpness by running the point across your finger or thumbnail.
Step 2
Sharpen a dull hook with a hook hone. Hold the hook by the shank with the point facing toward you. Position the hook so that the short length, between the point and the bend, is flat on the hook hone. Pull the hook toward you one time. Tilt the hook to the left and to the right, pulling toward you one time on each side. Check the sharpness of the hook and repeat if necessary.
Step 3
Replace the hook if it is damaged or rusted excessively. Cut the hook from the fishing line with a pair of scissors. Attach a new hook, or reconnect a hook if the knot has become loose while fishing.
Step 4
Attach a fishing line to the eye of the hook with a reliable knot such as the Palomar. Thread the fishing line through the hook eye so several inches of the free end of the line extend past the hook.
Step 5
Turn the line back and through the hook eye creating a loop on one side and a double line on the other. Hold the loop in one hand and the double line in the other, and tie a simple over hand knot. Pull the loop down from the over hand knot and around the bend of the hook. Moisten the knot with saliva and pull tight.
 

Article Written By Keith Dooley

Keith Dooley has a degree in outdoor education and sports management. He has worked as an assistant athletic director, head coach and assistant coach in various sports including football, softball and golf. Dooley has worked for various websites in the past, contributing instructional articles on a wide variety of topics.

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