How to Put a Lure on a Fishing Line

How to Put a Lure on a Fishing Line
Choose a knot that retains as much line strength as possible and you are more likely to retain your lure and reel in a fish. Most anglers use single-fiber monofilament line created from a mixture of polymers. The elasticity of this line makes it ideal for fishing, but due to its smooth surface knots can be somewhat difficult to secure. Using the right knot can alleviate this potential nuisance. Though knot tying might initially sound difficult, each of the following examples can be mastered with a minimum of time and effort.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Double Clinch Knot

Things You’ll Need:
  • Vegetable oil
  • Scissors
 
Step 1
Use this knot when attaching monofilament line to a lure where a little room for lure play is desired.
Step 2
Start by folding the line so it doubles back on itself for 6 inches. Thread the looped end of the line through the eyelet of the lure. Pull the line through until the eyelet of the lure rests halfway between the ends of the doubled line.
Step 3
Wrap the looped end of the line around the open end of the line five times. Thread the looped end of the line through the loop holding the lure.
Step 4
Lubricate the knot with vegetable oil, water or saliva before tightening. Cut the excess with scissors.

Trilene Knot

Step 1
Use this knot when attaching a lure to monofilament line where the eyelet thickness is greater than the line diameter.
Step 2
Thread the line through the eyelet of the lure twice. Wrap the end of the line around the standing end of the line six times.
Step 3
Thread the end of the line through the two loops that encircle the eyelet. Moisten the knot with vegetable oil, water or saliva. Pull tight before using scissors to trim excess line.

Rapala Knot

Step 1
Use this knot to provide a lure with a maximum amount of play as well as greater distribution of force, thanks to a central wrap.
Step 2
Form a loop 5 inches from the line's end. Draw the end underneath the standing line and through the loop creating an overhand knot.
Step 3
Thread the end of the line through the eyelet of the lure. Pass the end of the line back through the overhand knot.
Step 4
Wrap the end of the line around the standing line three times. Pass the end of the line through the overhand knot.
Step 5
Pass the end of the line through the loop just created between the top of the triple wrap and the overhand knot. Lubricate with vegetable oil, water or saliva before tightening and clip the excess line using scissors.
 

Article Written By Mike Biscoe

Mike Biscoe has been writing since 2009. Focusing on travel, sports and entertainment topics, he has credits in various online publications including LIVESTRONG.COM and Trails. He often writes articles covering uncommon travel destinations from firsthand experience. Biscoe holds a Certificate of Completion in acting from the Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts.

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