Homemade Fishing Jigs

Homemade Fishing JigsFishing jigs are used by anglers to attract and catch a variety of fresh and saltwater game fish. Jigs typically feature a weighted head made of lead with a formed shoulder extending partially down the hook shank. A variety of natural materials can be attached to the jig for luring fish. Although jigs are readily available for purchase, making your own jigs at home is an opportunity to customize lures based on your fishing needs.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

How to:

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fly-tying vise
  • Jig head hook
  • Fly-tying head cement
  • Animal hairs or feathers
  • Cotton thread
  • Scissors
 
Step 1
Place a lead head jig hook in the jaws of a fly-tying vise. Choose a jig head hook size based on your fishing needs and personal preference.
Step 2
Place a thin coat of fly-tying head cement on the shoulder of the hook. The shoulder is the area between the base of the jig head and the raised bait holder.
Step 3
Wrap several turns of cotton or similar thread around the shoulder. Cover the entire shoulder with thread creating a secure mounting base.
Step 4
Place a clump of animal hairs or feathers on the shoulder. Stack or even the ends as much as possible to the base of the lead jig head. Secure the hairs or feathers with several turns of thread.
Step 5
Add more clumps of hair or feathers, working your way completely around the shoulder of the jig. Finish the jig by wrapping the entire length of the jig shoulder with thread. Tie off the thread and cut it free from the spool with scissors.
Step 6
Trim any hairs or feathers extending up past the base of the jig head with scissors. Apply a coat of head cement to the threads to seal the wraps and provide a layer of protection for the thread while fishing.
 

Article Written By Keith Dooley

Keith Dooley has a degree in outdoor education and sports management. He has worked as an assistant athletic director, head coach and assistant coach in various sports including football, softball and golf. Dooley has worked for various websites in the past, contributing instructional articles on a wide variety of topics.

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