How to Create Kayak Crate Leashes

How to Create Kayak Crate Leashes
Because space is so limited on kayaks, cords called leashes are used to secure items like fishing crates, rods, nets, paddles and even small coolers to provide sustenance to hungry fishermen and store live bait for hungry fish. If your kayak did not come equipped with crate leashes, it's possible to make them yourself. Many experienced kayakers actually prefer to purchase stripped down kayaks so that they can outfit them to their own specifications and save money at the same time.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Old cell phone cord (coiled variety)
  • Wire cutters
  • 2 snaps
  • 2 plastic zip ties
  • Fishing crate
  • Kayak
Step 1
Cut off the end of the cell phone charging unit that plugs into the car or wall from the used cell phone charging cord with wire cutters.
Step 2
Thread the end of the cell phone cord through the hole at the bottom of a snap and double it over. Secure the doubled over part of the cord with a plastic zip tie pulled tightly with your hands. Pull the zip tie as tightly as possible with the thick edge of your wire cutters, and then use the thin edge of the wire cutters to trim the excess plastic from the zip tie.
Step 3
Cut off the end of the cell phone charger that plugs into the cell phone with your wire cutters. Thread the end of the cell phone cord through the hole at the bottom of the second snap in the same manner that you did with the first.
Step 4
Double over the cell phone cord and secure it with a plastic zip tie with your hands. Tighten the zip tie with your wire cutters, again using the thick edge, and then trim the excess plastic from the zip tie with the thin edge of the wire cutters.
Step 5
Clip one snap of your homemade kayak leash to your fishing crate and the other to your kayak.

Tips & Warnings

 
Make a few extra kayak leashes and keep them in your kayak.
 
If you don't have an old cell phone cord available, you can substitute an 1/8-inch bungee cord and secure a loop on each end with a plastic toggle.
 
Don't cut the zip ties too closely or you can accidentally open them. Leave a small amount of excess length at the end of the zip tie when you trim it.

Article Written By Elizabeth Grace

Based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Elizabeth Grace is a freelance writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in public relations from Pepperdine University, and has 15 years of experience developing marketing campaigns for universities and multinational corporations.

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