The Method of Fishing for Flounder

The Method of Fishing for Flounder
Flounder are easy to spot. This very flat saltwater fish has continuous fins running the length of its neck and tail and has two eyes on the same side. Measuring an average 20 inches and weighing about eight pounds, an adult flounder is a tasty big catch for anglers. Because flounder are dark in color, most prefer to swim and feed in dark waters. Take advantage of the feeding and swimming habits of flounder the next time you go fishing, so you get the most strikes possible.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Rod and reel
  • Fishing line
  • Hook
  • Sinker
  • Bait
Step 1
Fish the right depth for the season. Fish deep waters, where it is cooler, in the summer and shallow waters in the winter. During winter months, fish bays, estuaries and rivers.
Step 2
Use a black fish hook, cod hook or other small hook such as a size 8. Bait your line with squid, clams, worms or minnows.
Step 3
Finish your setup with a 2- to 20-pound sinker depending on the depth of water you are fishing. Use a 2-pound sinker for shallow water and 20-pound sinker for low depths.
Step 4
Cast your line to the bottom. The darker and muddier the water, the better your opportunity is for a strike.
Step 5
Keep your drag loose, so your line can float across the bottom, where flounders are more likely to strike. You will feel your line move across the bottom. If you do not feel the bottom, sink your line farther down until you do.

Tips & Warnings

 
Flounder are frequently found in waters where bass are swimming.
 
Your sinker must be heavy enough to sink your line straight down to the bottom.

Article Written By Charlie Gaston

Charlie Gaston has written numerous instructional articles on topics ranging from business to communications and estate planning. Gaston holds a bachelor's degree in international business and a master's degree in communications. She is fluent in Spanish and has extensive travel experience.

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