How to Rig Up for Catching a Walleye

How to Rig Up for Catching a Walleye
Walleye are freshwater sport fish that are found in rivers and lakes. There is a large following of anglers who devote much of their time to catching this fish due to its size and the ferocity of the fight when hooked. The basic rig for catching walleye involves a spinner blade, beads and a hook.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Medium-heavy to heavy rod at least 7 feet long with matching reel Minimum 12-pound-test monofilament line No. 4 hooks Beads of various colors Spinner blade
  • Medium-heavy to heavy rod at least 7 feet long with matching reel
  • Minimum 12-pound-test monofilament line
  • No. 4 hooks
  • Beads of various colors
  • Spinner blade
 
Step 1
Pull 4 to 5 feet of line from the end of the rod. This will give you enough line to comfortably work with when attaching the parts to make the rig.
Step 2
Assemble the spinner blade so that the U-shaped clevis fits through the hole in the spinner blade. There will be a small opening on both ends of the clevis for the line to be fed through, thus attaching the spinner to the line. Feed the line through the clevis.
Step 3
Slide four to six beads onto the line after the spinner-blade assembly. Use a variety of colors and combinations. Keep in mind that certain water conditions may warrant different colors--murky or muddy water may dictate brighter colors. The beads also serve the purpose of making noise to help attract the fish.
Step 4
Tie on a No. 4 hook with a clinch knot. Here's how: Feed the free or tag end of the line through the eye of the hook so that 3 to 4 inches of line extends beyond the opening. Wrap the tag end of the line around the main line six or seven times. Feed the tag end back down and through the small opening formed above the eye, moisten the knot and pull tight.
Step 5
Test the rig to ensure the blade and beads freely move in the water during retrieval. Make adjustments if necessary.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Experiment with different colors and shapes of spinner blades as well as beads.
 
Use care when handling and tying hooks to the line. Hooks are honed very sharp from the manufacturer and may cause a cut.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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