Travel to Shenzhen China

Travel to Shenzhen China
Getting to Shenzhen is not a problem--the city is an economic powerhouse in south China, and as such enjoys extensive air, rail and road connections. It's also right across the Shenzhen river from Hong Kong, which in itself is a massive transportation hub. Use one of several easy ways to get to Shenzhen.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Passport Valid visa issued by the Chinese government Some knowledge of standard Chinese
  • Passport
  • Valid visa issued by the Chinese government
  • Some knowledge of standard Chinese
 
Step 1
Arrive at one of China's two major international airports -- either Shanghai Pudong or Beijing International. Connections to Shenzhen Baoan Airport are easy to come by, since the city is served by many major Chinese airlines. These include China Southern, Air Shenzhen and Air China.

There are only a few international direct flights to Shenzhen, and none from the U.S.
Step 2
Land at Hong Kong International Airport, and you have a few options to reach Shenzhen. There are regular ferries crossing the river directly to Shenzhen, as well as buses that cross the border to various locations in Shenzhen. Go to the clearly marked information desks to inquire, or simply follow signs directing you to "buses to mainland". Staff all speak at least some English.
Step 3
Take the train from Hong Kong--it's the fastest land route to Shenzhen. Trains leave regularly from Tsim Sha Tsui East as part of the MTR network. The main entry points to Shenzhen, Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau, are served, but arrivals still need to pass customs and immigration.
Step 4
Hop on a bus from Hong Kong--most people catch them from Wan Chai at the Star Ferry terminal, but a newer, less crowded option is to take a bus from the Elements mall, also known as Kowloon station, in Jordan. Bus trips take approximately an hour. Buses from Elements arrive on the western side of Shenzhen Bay, close to Shekou. Getting downtown from there calls for a taxi ride, which costs about 50-60 RMB, or about $7-9 U.S.
Step 5
Make an adventure out of it if in any major mainland China city--all have train links to Shenzhen. Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Xiamen and other coastal urban areas are especially well-served. Trains leave at least several times a day from Beijing and Shanghai, but depending on type of train, travel times can be up to two days.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Car services are available from Hong Kong to Shenzhen, making for a very pictur-esque, comfortable ride. Ask at any hotel or car rental agency for details, but be warned this costs much more than taking a train. It's possible to hike into Shenzhen from Hong Kong, all the way from the rather lovely hills around Shatin and the plains basin of Yuen Long--these hikes are around 10 miles. The good thing is that both Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau normally accept foot crossings.
 
Car services are available from Hong Kong to Shenzhen, making for a very pictur-esque, comfortable ride. Ask at any hotel or car rental agency for details, but be warned this costs much more than taking a train.
 
It's possible to hike into Shenzhen from Hong Kong, all the way from the rather lovely hills around Shatin and the plains basin of Yuen Long--these hikes are around 10 miles. The good thing is that both Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau normally accept foot crossings.
 
Don't get confused--Shenzhen Baoan Airport is now increasingly known as Shenzhen International. Avoid late arrivals to the Hong Kong-Shenzhen border crossings--they close at midnight, and get swamped in the late evening. Day visas are no longer available on the Shenzhen side of the border--make sure you have the right to enter mainland China before arriving at the border, no matter how long you intend to stay.
 
Don't get confused--Shenzhen Baoan Airport is now increasingly known as Shenzhen International.
 
Avoid late arrivals to the Hong Kong-Shenzhen border crossings--they close at midnight, and get swamped in the late evening.
 
Day visas are no longer available on the Shenzhen side of the border--make sure you have the right to enter mainland China before arriving at the border, no matter how long you intend to stay.

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