How to Camp at Grand Tetons

How to Camp at Grand Tetons
Often overshadowed by Yellowstone National Park, the magnificent Grand Tetons in Wyoming attract a sizable number of campers every year. Visiting the park requires more planning than the normal camping trip, especially for backcountry or RV campers arriving during peak season, mid- to late summer.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Options

Things You’ll Need:
  • RV, trailer or tent
  • Bear-safe food containers
  • Bear spray
  • Water treatment kit (backcountry only)
 
Step 1
Make an advance reservation if you have a recreational vehicle or trailer. The National Park Service strongly recommends reservations because of the popularity of those sites with hookups for RVs and trailers.
Step 2
Pay the general admission fee for Grand Teton National Park. Those planning to camp longer should consider the Grand Teton-Yellowstone pass, which lasts for one year.
Step 3
Take your RV or trailer to Colter Bay and Flagg Ranch, the only two campgrounds in the park that handle them.
Step 4
Choose between front country and backcountry camping if you have a tent. Front-country campers can choose between Gros Ventre and Jenny Lake (these sites have flush toilets) and Lizard Creek and Signal Mountain (these have dump stations but no other amenities).
Step 5
Make a reservation if you want to camp in the backcountry. Reservations can be made for the year between January 1 and May 15 of that year. The park is split into regions, and each region has a quota of backcountry campers allowed at one time. One-third of those are for those with reservations, and two-thirds are on a first-come, first-serve basis with requests filed the day before the proposed backcountry hike begins.

Rules

Step 1
Operate on a "leave-no-trace" footing. Pack whatever trash you can't dispose of naturally. The park service bans building improvements such as walls and improvised furniture from tree parts.
Step 2
Light fires in designated areas only. Creating new fire pits, even in backcountry sites, is banned. Bring a portable camping stove if starting a fire worries you.
Step 3
Be bear safe. Store all food in bear-safe containers. Make noise when hiking on trails in areas where you could encounter a bear. Bring a can of bear spray-just in case.
Step 4
Bring chemical additives and filters for treating water while backcountry camping. You cannot pack all the water if you will camp for more than one night.
Step 5
Bring a rain poncho or coat, water-resistant shoes and rain covers for tents and backpacks. The weather in the Grand Tetons can be unpredictable. Don't rely on weather forecasts.
 

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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