Brown Beetle Fly Tying Instructions

Brown Beetle Fly Tying Instructions
Beetles are a major part of the trout and bass diet, so a floating or sinking beetle fly can be used to catch fish around the world. Numerous variations of the beetle exist, and you can tie your fly as a dry fly or a sinking fly. Many of the fly patterns for the brown beetle require numerous steps and materials but the actual beetle is a simple terrestrial that can be successfully imitated with a simple fly pattern. The beetle is most effective during the fall when the bug is blown from stream-side vegetation into the water. Beetles are poor travelers and are susceptible to a mild wind. When available in large numbers, the fish will focus exclusively on eating the beetles.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Size 8-10 Tiemco 2457 hook
  • 6/0 brown thread
  • Brown 2mm fly-tying foam
  • Large brown chenille
  • Head cement
Step 1
Wrap the tying thread from the eye of the hook to the bend of the hook in an even layer. Cut a 3/4-inch-wide layer of brown foam. Hold the foam on the hook and wrap the thread over the foam from the bend in the hook to the eye of the hook.
Step 2
Wrap the thread back to the bend in the hook. Wrap the thread tightly and cover the entire length of foam on the hook shank. Make several wraps of thread to secure the chenille to the hook shank at the bend in the hook. Wrap the thread to the eye of the hook.
Step 3
Wrap the chenille in an even layer to the eye of the hook. Wrap the chenille evenly and be sure it is tight to the hook shank. Make several wraps of thread to finish the chenille at the eye of the hook. Cut the tag end of the chenille.
Step 4
Tightly pull the foam strip over the hook shank and secure the foam at the eye of the hook with several wraps of thread. Cut the foam, leaving 1/4 inch over the eye of the hook. Wrap the thread over and behind the end of the foam until the foam is secure and the end is lifted slightly off the eye of the hook.
Step 5
Use a whip finisher to knot the thread under the end of the foam. Cut the thread and add a drop of head cement to the thread head to secure the fly. Cut the end of the foam at a 45-degree angle on both sides of the overhang.

Tips & Warnings

 
You can add a brown marabou tail for additional action. You can also leave out the foam and make several wraps of brown hackle near the eye of the hook to create a dry fly. The beetle can be tied in red and black or pure black to imitate several common beetles.

Article Written By Zach Lazzari

Zach Lazzari is an outdoor writing specialist. He has experience in website writing as well as standard newspaper writing. He wrote an outdoor column for the Silver World in Lake City, Colo., and articles for Colorado-mountain-adventure.com. Lazzari is currently completing his bachelor's degree online through Arizona State University and lives in southwest Montana.

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