How to Make a Minnow Bait Tank

How to Make a Minnow Bait Tank
Minnows are small fish. Swimming in schools along the banks and coastlines of freshwater and saltwater rivers, lakes and ponds, minnows are prey to larger fish such as the bluegill and largemouth bass. Minnows are easy to store in a tank and can be kept alive if housed in the right environment and under the correct conditions.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Holding tank
  • Water tank lid
  • Drill and drill bit
  • Spigot-style drain
  • Epoxy
  • Hose
  • Aerator
  • Bubbler
Step 1
Purchase a bait-holding tank with at least a 20-gallon capacity. Situate the tank in a kitchen or bathroom where a facet and an electrical outlet is available.
Step 2
Use a drill bit to drill a hole and install a drain. Mark the bottom of the tank and drill the hole. Install a spigot-type drain plug in the hole. Seal the drain plug with epoxy. Allow to the epoxy dry before continuing.
Step 3
Run a standard water tank hose from the drain to the bait tank. Fill the tank with water. Adjust the water output so the right ratio of cold to hot water is used. (Use a thermometer to check the temperature if necessary.) Once the tank is filled, it is not necessary to continually check the water temperature. It can remain at room temperature, which is generally around 75 degrees F.
Step 4
Install an aerator to oxygenate the water. Place the aerator pump inside the tank and allow the hose to hang over the side of the tank. This will allow the system to draw in air through the hose. Tank aerators generally operate silently and are small in size.
Step 5
Attach a bubbler to the inside of the tank. Bubblers create turbulence and current, which minimize stress and may increase the lifespan of your minnows.
Step 6
Cover the tank with a water tank lid, which is available at pet stores, filter stores and online.

Tips & Warnings

 
You can also use a small, clean horse trough to house your minnows.
 
Fathead minnows thrive in water with a temperature of 60 to 75 degrees F.
 
Minnows can die with a change in environment, including a change in water temperature.

Article Written By Charlie Gaston

Charlie Gaston has written numerous instructional articles on topics ranging from business to communications and estate planning. Gaston holds a bachelor's degree in international business and a master's degree in communications. She is fluent in Spanish and has extensive travel experience.

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