How to Tie Salmon Lures

How to Tie Salmon Lures
Salmon are predatory fish that bite in a particular way. Fisherman and anglers can recognize a salmon bite as a slight tap or tug on the line, versus a big grab and run which is more characteristic of larger fish. Salmon are also prone to bite and nibble at things in front of them. The best way to determine if a salmon has taken hold of your hook is to look for water disturbance and pay attention to the current. If a salmon has mouthed your hook, you should immediately be able to feel the weight of your line being dragged across the bottom of the water. To prevent from losing your lure during this process, it's important to tie salmon lures properly.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fishing reel/rod
  • Monofilament fishing line
  • Large bead and a Spin-N-Glow body
  • Snap swivel
  • Weight
Step 1
Tie a 25 to 30 pound leader using the Uni knot. Run 6 inches of fishing line through a swivel and pull it back so two parallel lines form. Circle the tag end over the lines. Wrap the line 6 to 7 times around the parallel lines and then thread the tag end through the circle. Pull the line to tighten and then slide forward. Cut the line.
Step 2
Slide on a large bead and a Spin-N-Glow body.
Step 3
Attach a snap swivel onto the tag end of the leader.
Step 4
Attach a 1 to 2.5-ounce weight to the snap swivel. Use a ball or teardrop shaped weight that can stay on the bottom of the water in rough currents.

Tips & Warnings

 
Fishing leader is located between the fishing line and the lure.
 
The line between your bottom hook and weight should measure approximately 18 to 24 inches.

Article Written By Charlie Gaston

Charlie Gaston has written numerous instructional articles on topics ranging from business to communications and estate planning. Gaston holds a bachelor's degree in international business and a master's degree in communications. She is fluent in Spanish and has extensive travel experience.

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